Rectangular section of black siltstone architecture of Nectanebo I: decorated on both sides in sunk relief with offering scenes above a niche-patterned dado and crowned by a cavetto cornice. Atop the cornice, on the better-preserved side of this slab, a row of falcons faced forward; only the legs and feet have survived. The corresponding decoration on the other side has been lost, but it probably consisted of a row of erect cobras. The more damaged side was decorated with an offering scene and part of another one. To the left, an animal-headed god stands facing right. The king kneels before him in a semi-prostrate position, with one leg extended back. At the right is another standing god from a second, similar scene. The inscriptions name the king as Nectanebo I. The damage inflicted on this side is of several kinds and may have occurred several times during antiquity. The figures have been attacked with a chisel, though the inscriptions were left intact. The protruding parts of the cornice were cut back to make a flat surface, presumably an adaptation for reuse. The better-preserved side, also inscribed for Nectanebo I, has a single figure of the king kneeling to present a tall loaf of bread. This pose, like the semi-prostrate position, was traditional for kings making offerings. The pose has been designed to show only one leg and an inadequate number of toes. The modeling of Nectanebo's body, with the breast, rib cage, and round abdomen as discrete units, follows the style of the late Twenty-sixth Dynasty. Characteristically Thirtieth Dynasty, however, is the representation of the hands with their long, waving fingers. The most noteworthy feature of this figure is its head - crowned only with a very unusual tight-fitting cap and a uraeus.The face is striking, both beaky and jowly, with the eye set in a large, round socket; small, rather delicate nostril and lips; and the hint of a double chin. It is understandable that this face is usually considered to be a portrait likeness of Nectanebo, especially since the same features are depicted on the two other architectural slabs that bear his name and image. Two holes have been drilled in the slab.

Museum number

EA22

Description

Full: Back

Rectangular section of black siltstone architecture of Nectanebo I: decorated on both sides in sunk relief with offering scenes above a niche-patterned dado and crowned by a cavetto cornice. Atop the cornice, on the better-preserved side of this slab, a row of falcons faced forward; only the legs and feet have survived. The corresponding decoration on the other side has been lost, but it probably consisted of a row of erect cobras. The more damaged side was decorated with an offering scene and part of another one. To the left, an animal-headed god stands facing right. The king kneels before him in a semi-prostrate position, with one leg extended back. At the right is another standing god from a second, similar scene. The inscriptions name the king as Nectanebo I. The damage inflicted on this side is of several kinds and may have occurred several times during antiquity. The figures have been attacked with a chisel, though the inscriptions were left intact. The protruding parts of the cornice were cut back to make a flat surface, presumably an adaptation for reuse. The better-preserved side, also inscribed for Nectanebo I, has a single figure of the king kneeling to present a tall loaf of bread. This pose, like the semi-prostrate position, was traditional for kings making offerings. The pose has been designed to show only one leg and an inadequate number of toes. The modeling of Nectanebo's body, with the breast, rib cage, and round abdomen as discrete units, follows the style of the late Twenty-sixth Dynasty. Characteristically Thirtieth Dynasty, however, is the representation of the hands with their long, waving fingers. The most noteworthy feature of this figure is its head - crowned only with a very unusual tight-fitting cap and a uraeus.The face is striking, both beaky and jowly, with the eye set in a large, round socket; small, rather delicate nostril and lips; and the hint of a double chin. It is understandable that this face is usually considered to be a portrait likeness of Nectanebo, especially since the same features are depicted on the two other architectural slabs that bear his name and image. Two holes have been drilled in the slab.

Back to object details 

Image service:

Recommend


More views

  • COMPASS Title: Basalt slab of Nectanebo I

    Unknown

  • Rectangular section of black siltstone architecture of Nectanebo I: decorated on both sides in sunk relief with offering scenes above a niche-patterned dado and crowned by a cavetto cornice. Atop the cornice, on the better-preserved side of this slab, a row of falcons faced forward; only the legs and feet have survived. The corresponding decoration on the other side has been lost, but it probably consisted of a row of erect cobras. The more damaged side was decorated with an offering scene and part of another one. To the left, an animal-headed god stands facing right. The king kneels before him in a semi-prostrate position, with one leg extended back. At the right is another standing god from a second, similar scene. The inscriptions name the king as Nectanebo I. The damage inflicted on this side is of several kinds and may have occurred several times during antiquity. The figures have been attacked with a chisel, though the inscriptions were left intact. The protruding parts of the cornice were cut back to make a flat surface, presumably an adaptation for reuse. The better-preserved side, also inscribed for Nectanebo I, has a single figure of the king kneeling to present a tall loaf of bread. This pose, like the semi-prostrate position, was traditional for kings making offerings. The pose has been designed to show only one leg and an inadequate number of toes. The modeling of Nectanebo's body, with the breast, rib cage, and round abdomen as discrete units, follows the style of the late Twenty-sixth Dynasty. Characteristically Thirtieth Dynasty, however, is the representation of the hands with their long, waving fingers. The most noteworthy feature of this figure is its head - crowned only with a very unusual tight-fitting cap and a uraeus.The face is striking, both beaky and jowly, with the eye set in a large, round socket; small, rather delicate nostril and lips; and the hint of a double chin. It is understandable that this face is usually considered to be a portrait likeness of Nectanebo, especially since the same features are depicted on the two other architectural slabs that bear his name and image. Two holes have been drilled in the slab.

    Full: Front

  • Rectangular section of black siltstone architecture of Nectanebo I: decorated on both sides in sunk relief with offering scenes above a niche-patterned dado and crowned by a cavetto cornice. Atop the cornice, on the better-preserved side of this slab, a row of falcons faced forward; only the legs and feet have survived. The corresponding decoration on the other side has been lost, but it probably consisted of a row of erect cobras. The more damaged side was decorated with an offering scene and part of another one. To the left, an animal-headed god stands facing right. The king kneels before him in a semi-prostrate position, with one leg extended back. At the right is another standing god from a second, similar scene. The inscriptions name the king as Nectanebo I. The damage inflicted on this side is of several kinds and may have occurred several times during antiquity. The figures have been attacked with a chisel, though the inscriptions were left intact. The protruding parts of the cornice were cut back to make a flat surface, presumably an adaptation for reuse. The better-preserved side, also inscribed for Nectanebo I, has a single figure of the king kneeling to present a tall loaf of bread. This pose, like the semi-prostrate position, was traditional for kings making offerings. The pose has been designed to show only one leg and an inadequate number of toes. The modeling of Nectanebo's body, with the breast, rib cage, and round abdomen as discrete units, follows the style of the late Twenty-sixth Dynasty. Characteristically Thirtieth Dynasty, however, is the representation of the hands with their long, waving fingers. The most noteworthy feature of this figure is its head - crowned only with a very unusual tight-fitting cap and a uraeus.The face is striking, both beaky and jowly, with the eye set in a large, round socket; small, rather delicate nostril and lips; and the hint of a double chin. It is understandable that this face is usually considered to be a portrait likeness of Nectanebo, especially since the same features are depicted on the two other architectural slabs that bear his name and image. Two holes have been drilled in the slab.

    Full: Back