Museum number

124801,c

Description

Back to object details 

Image service:

Recommend


More views

  • Limestone wall panel, incomplete; lower register, Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) relief; shows Assyrians defeating Elamites of southern Iran; battle scene on lower half; Assyrians attacking from left; critical events are picked out; executi

    Full: Front

  • Limestone wall panel, incomplete; lower register, Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) relief; shows Assyrians defeating Elamites of southern Iran; battle scene on lower half; Assyrians attacking from left; critical events are picked out; execution of the Elamite King, Teumman and his son Tammaritu, river Ulai on right; upper register shows review of prisoners deported after campaign.

    Detail: Other

  • Limestone wall panel, incomplete; lower register, Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) relief; shows Assyrians defeating Elamites of southern Iran; battle scene on lower half; Assyrians attacking from left; critical events are picked out; execution of the Elamite King, Teumman and his son Tammaritu, river Ulai on right; upper register shows review of prisoners deported after campaign.

    Detail: Other

  • Limestone wall panel, incomplete; lower register, Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) relief; shows Assyrians defeating Elamites of southern Iran; battle scene on lower half; Assyrians attacking from left; critical events are picked out; execution of the Elamite King, Teumman and his son Tammaritu, river Ulai on right; upper register shows review of prisoners deported after campaign.

    Detail: Other

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. This sequence starts near the centre of the composition, with the crash of the chariot carrying the Elamite king, Teptihubaninsushnak, known to the Assyrians as Teumman, together with his son   Tammaritu. Teumman is distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe; Tammaritu is dressed like the other Elamites. The two are thrown out of the chariot, and Teumman's hat falls off, revealing his receding hairline.    The upper register is missing.

    Detail: Other

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Detail: Other

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Full: Front

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Full: Front

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Full: Front

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Full: Front

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Detail: Other

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Detail: Other

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Full: Front

  • Limestone wall-panel depicting the Battle of Til-Tuba (Battle of the River Ulai) in relief: in the lower register, the Assyrians are attacking from the left. The two armies are clearly distinguished by their equipment. The Assyrian cavalry and some of the infantry have pointed helmets and wear scale-armour above the belt; most of them carry spears and shields, as do other infantrymen in crested helmets, and there are lightly armed archers with headbands. They tend to operate in pairs,  with an archer protected by a spearman. The Elamites are nearly all lightly armed archers, with  headbands  tied  at the back;  their quivers are decorated with palmettes. Some of them are riding carts drawn by donkeys or mules. It is clear that, once the heavily armed Assyrians have forced their way through the Elamite lines, the Elamites cannot operate effectively at close quarters. They stumble back down the side of the mound, and their retreat turns into a rout, which ends as they are driven into the River Ulai. The growing chaos is graphically reflected in the overall arrangement, with the largely horizontal lines of figures losing coherence as they move right, and the river stopping them dead as it cuts across the scene from top to bottom.    Within the battle, critical incidents are picked out, forming an internal sequence of events like a strip-cartoon operating independently of the general progress of the battle. The Elamite king, Teumman, distinguished by his royal hat and fringed robe, and his son, Tammaritu are depicted leaving the wreckage of their crashed chariot, with its struggling horses. The two hurry off right, but Teumman is hit by an arrow. His son shoots back, but the two are surrounded and killed. The Assyrians killing them do not use ordinary weapons of war but axes and maces; there is symbolism here,  as maces represented authority and were employed for executions. Then the Elamites' heads are cut off. An Assyrian soldier recovers Teumman's hat from the ground,  and another hurries back left, waving Teumman's head in the air. The head next appears further left, held by an Assyrian in front of a tent where Elamites, some of whom were on the Assyrian side, are being employed to identify  the  dead. Finally an Elamite cart drives off left, with an Assyrian soldier in it waving the head triumphantly. The  head was taken to Assyria, where Ashurbanipal had sensibly remained, and was subjected to various indignities.    The upper register shows review of prisoners deported after the campaign.

    Detail: Other