Museum number

EA10470,5

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  • 'Book of the Dead', Papyrus of Ani (sheet 5): The Funeral Procession: this sheet shows Ani's funeral procession as it moves toward his tomb, where it will be met by grieving women and where the coffin will be stood erect for the last rites and the widow's last farewell before being taken into its final resting place. The writing of the long spell below is retrograde.The backward writing presumably had a magical meaning. Two pairs of oxen, guided by four men, haul the sledge bearing the coffin, which is preceded by a priest in a leopard-skin vestment. He turns back toward the coffin, to wave an incense burner and pour liquid from a tall libation vase. The large bier has the prow and stern of a boat, like the boat in which the sun god traveled across the sky. Large formal bouquets and statuettes of Nephthys and Isis flank the head and the foot of the anthropoid coffin, which is evidently on public display during its slow, final journey. Ani's widow, kneeling beside the bier, has bared her breast in her sorrow and tears from her kohl-rimmed eyes track down her cheek. Behind the coffin walk Ani's most important mourners, male relatives and colleagues, one of whom is a white-haired elder. The last man in the group turns his head away, apparently to hide or wipe away tears. The hand held over the hair of the next figure to the right indicates that he is casting dust on his head. All these men's gestures were standard gestures of mourning. A second sledge, pulled by four men, holds a chest decorated with the 'djed' pillar of Osiris and the 'tiyet' knot of Isis and topped by a recumbent figure of Anubis. This is a container for the four canopic jars which held the separately mummified internal organs. Two lesser mourners follow. At the tail of the procession, here squeezed into an upper register, some of Ani's servants bear possessions that will be left in the tomb. These certainly do not represent everything buried with Ani, but include some of the most important, such as his scribal palette and carrying case.

    Full: Front

  • 'Book of the Dead', Papyrus of Ani (sheet 5): The Funeral Procession: this sheet shows Ani's funeral procession as it moves toward his tomb, where it will be met by grieving women and where the coffin will be stood erect for the last rites and the widow's last farewell before being taken into its final resting place. The writing of the long spell below is retrograde.The backward writing presumably had a magical meaning. Two pairs of oxen, guided by four men, haul the sledge bearing the coffin, which is preceded by a priest in a leopard-skin vestment. He turns back toward the coffin, to wave an incense burner and pour liquid from a tall libation vase. The large bier has the prow and stern of a boat, like the boat in which the sun god traveled across the sky. Large formal bouquets and statuettes of Nephthys and Isis flank the head and the foot of the anthropoid coffin, which is evidently on public display during its slow, final journey. Ani's widow, kneeling beside the bier, has bared her breast in her sorrow and tears from her kohl-rimmed eyes track down her cheek. Behind the coffin walk Ani's most important mourners, male relatives and colleagues, one of whom is a white-haired elder. The last man in the group turns his head away, apparently to hide or wipe away tears. The hand held over the hair of the next figure to the right indicates that he is casting dust on his head. All these men's gestures were standard gestures of mourning. A second sledge, pulled by four men, holds a chest decorated with the 'djed' pillar of Osiris and the 'tiyet' knot of Isis and topped by a recumbent figure of Anubis. This is a container for the four canopic jars which held the separately mummified internal organs. Two lesser mourners follow. At the tail of the procession, here squeezed into an upper register, some of Ani's servants bear possessions that will be left in the tomb. These certainly do not represent everything buried with Ani, but include some of the most important, such as his scribal palette and carrying case.

    Detail: Other

  • 'Book of the Dead', Papyrus of Ani (sheet 5): The Funeral Procession: this sheet shows Ani's funeral procession as it moves toward his tomb, where it will be met by grieving women and where the coffin will be stood erect for the last rites and the widow's last farewell before being taken into its final resting place. The writing of the long spell below is retrograde.The backward writing presumably had a magical meaning. Two pairs of oxen, guided by four men, haul the sledge bearing the coffin, which is preceded by a priest in a leopard-skin vestment. He turns back toward the coffin, to wave an incense burner and pour liquid from a tall libation vase. The large bier has the prow and stern of a boat, like the boat in which the sun god traveled across the sky. Large formal bouquets and statuettes of Nephthys and Isis flank the head and the foot of the anthropoid coffin, which is evidently on public display during its slow, final journey. Ani's widow, kneeling beside the bier, has bared her breast in her sorrow and tears from her kohl-rimmed eyes track down her cheek. Behind the coffin walk Ani's most important mourners, male relatives and colleagues, one of whom is a white-haired elder. The last man in the group turns his head away, apparently to hide or wipe away tears. The hand held over the hair of the next figure to the right indicates that he is casting dust on his head. All these men's gestures were standard gestures of mourning. A second sledge, pulled by four men, holds a chest decorated with the 'djed' pillar of Osiris and the 'tiyet' knot of Isis and topped by a recumbent figure of Anubis. This is a container for the four canopic jars which held the separately mummified internal organs. Two lesser mourners follow. At the tail of the procession, here squeezed into an upper register, some of Ani's servants bear possessions that will be left in the tomb. These certainly do not represent everything buried with Ani, but include some of the most important, such as his scribal palette and carrying case.

    Detail: Other

  • 'Book of the Dead', Papyrus of Ani (sheet 5): The Funeral Procession: this sheet shows Ani's funeral procession as it moves toward his tomb, where it will be met by grieving women and where the coffin will be stood erect for the last rites and the widow's last farewell before being taken into its final resting place. The writing of the long spell below is retrograde.The backward writing presumably had a magical meaning. Two pairs of oxen, guided by four men, haul the sledge bearing the coffin, which is preceded by a priest in a leopard-skin vestment. He turns back toward the coffin, to wave an incense burner and pour liquid from a tall libation vase. The large bier has the prow and stern of a boat, like the boat in which the sun god traveled across the sky. Large formal bouquets and statuettes of Nephthys and Isis flank the head and the foot of the anthropoid coffin, which is evidently on public display during its slow, final journey. Ani's widow, kneeling beside the bier, has bared her breast in her sorrow and tears from her kohl-rimmed eyes track down her cheek. Behind the coffin walk Ani's most important mourners, male relatives and colleagues, one of whom is a white-haired elder. The last man in the group turns his head away, apparently to hide or wipe away tears. The hand held over the hair of the next figure to the right indicates that he is casting dust on his head. All these men's gestures were standard gestures of mourning. A second sledge, pulled by four men, holds a chest decorated with the 'djed' pillar of Osiris and the 'tiyet' knot of Isis and topped by a recumbent figure of Anubis. This is a container for the four canopic jars which held the separately mummified internal organs. Two lesser mourners follow. At the tail of the procession, here squeezed into an upper register, some of Ani's servants bear possessions that will be left in the tomb. These certainly do not represent everything buried with Ani, but include some of the most important, such as his scribal palette and carrying case.

    Detail: Other

  • Cropped

    Full: Front

  • Cropped

    Full: Front