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Bunya no Asayasu 文屋朝康 / Hyakunin isshu uba ga etoki 百人一首姥がゑとき (One Hundred Poems by One Hundred Poets, Explained by the Nurse)

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1920,0514,0.1

  • Title (object)

    • Bunya no Asayasu 文屋朝康

    Title (series)

    • Hyakunin isshu uba ga etoki 百人一首姥がゑとき (One Hundred Poems by One Hundred Poets, Explained by the Nurse)
  • Description

    Colour woodblock print. Poem by Bunya no Asayasu, court pages in boat trying to keep it steady in the wind as they harvest lotus leaves

  • Producer name

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 1830s(late)
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 26.1 centimetres
    • Width: 37.1 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Hyakunin Isshu Uba ga Etoki
      • Inscription Comment

        series title
      • Inscription Type

        signature
      • Inscription Content

        前北斎卍
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Saki no Hokusai Manji
      • Inscription Type

        mark
      • Inscription Comment

        seal(publisher's.Eijudo)
  • Curator's comments

    Clark 2017

    Poem 37: Shira-tsuyu ni / kaze no fuki-shiku / aki no ta wa /
    tsuranuki tomenu / tama zo chirikeru (In the autumn fields /
    where the wind blows repeatedly / on the white
    dewdrops, / the gems, not strung together, / do scatter
    about indeed. Trans. Joshua Mostow.)
    Five court page-boys harvest lotus leaves from a pond.
    As two of them sort the harvest, another one strains to
    hook a final leaf before the wind carries their boat
    away, defeating the two inexperienced pole-men at the
    stern, who seem to be fighting each other more than
    the wind. Asayasu’s poem revises the ancient
    association between dew and gems by imagining the
    ‘dew/gems’ in their natural state, ‘not strung together’,
    as yet untouched by human hands. Following the
    poem, Hokusai shows dewdrops on leaves, but transfers
    the scene from fields to a pond and employs light
    comedy to convey the strength of the wind. This and
    the previous print (cat. 139) seem to form a pair of
    boating scenes.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Clark 2017 140 bibliographic details
    • Keyes & Morse 2015 671 bibliographic details
  • Location

    Not on display

  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:
    2017 Apr-Jul, London, BM, Japanese Galleries, 'Japan from prehistory to the present'

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1920

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    1920,0514,0.1

Woodblock print.Classical literature. Rural landscape. The poem by Funya Yasuhide, women in boat trying to keep it steady in the wind. Nishiki-e on paper.

Recto

Woodblock print.Classical literature. Rural landscape. The poem by Funya Yasuhide, women in boat trying to keep it steady in the wind. Nishiki-e on paper.

Image description

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