Collection online

The Parthenon Sculptures

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1816,0610.93

  • Title (series)

    • The Parthenon Sculptures
  • Description

    Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.
    A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.
    The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    More 

  • Producer name

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 438BC-432BC
  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Bibliography

    • Sculpture 303.D bibliographic details
    • Smith 1892 pp.107-108 bibliographic details
    • Choremi-Spetsieri 2004 pp.121, 125, 127, fig.88 bibliographic details
    • Palagia 1993 pp.19-20, 61, fig.32-36 bibliographic details
    • Brommer 1963 pp.7-9, pl.26-32 bibliographic details
    • Smith 1910 pp.9-10, pl.2 bibliographic details
  • Location

    On display: G18

  • Exhibition history

    2015, 26 Mar-5 Jul, The British Museum, Defining Beauty: the body in ancient Greek art.

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1816

  • Department

    Greek & Roman Antiquities

  • Registration number

    1816,0610.93

Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost. A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet. The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

Image description

Recommend


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about this object, please email: collectiondatabase@britishmuseum.org 

View open data for this object with SPARQL endpoint

Object reference number: GAA6842

British Museum collection data is also available in the W3C open data standard, RDF, allowing it to join and relate to a growing body of linked data published by organisations around the world.

View this object

Support the Museum:
donate online

The Museum makes its collection database available to be used by scholars around the world. Donations will help support curatorial, documentation and digitisation projects.

About the database

The British Museum collection database is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added every week.

More about the database 

Supporters

Work on this database is supported by a range of sponsors, donors and volunteers.

More about supporters and how you
can help  

Loading...