Collection online

digital photograph

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2013,2034.6155

  • Description

    Digital photograph (colour); view of engraved rock art on a rock face showing fourteen human figures and three unidentified quadruped. The panel is organized around seven outlined, pecked women of different sizes. The bigger four are upright facing left, with the arm to the right outstretched and the hand to the right infilled with pecking. The arm to the left is bent, holding a stick over the shoulder. The stick has three lines (leather strips?) hanging from the side. Some figures have three lines coming out of the heads (headdress?) and an horizontal, unidentified shape across the neck. The buttocks and thighs of the figures are abnormally wide (steatopygia?). All figures are infilled with pecked geometric patterns as straight and wavy lines, squares, meanders and, in one case, schematic birds representing (garments? tattoos?). To the right there are four outlined, pecked human figures upright, with bodies facing front, heads facing right and arms outstretched. To the left of these figures there is a pecked, unidentified quadruped. Niola Doa, Chad.
    Scanned

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  • Producer name

  • Date

    • 20 July 2006 (date digitized)
    • November 1996 (original photograph)
  • Production place

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • File size: 119 megabytes
    • Resolution: 300 dots per inch
  • Curator's comments

    See 2013,2034.6156, 6157, 6161, 6162, 6167, 2013, 6169-6171, 6173, 6176, 6256 -6261, 6317-6319, and 6321 for details.

    Figures belong to two different periods, the most schematic in the periphery of the tableau being later additions.

    The engravings of the rock art site of Niola Doa are some of the most important and best known depictions in the Ennedi Plateau and probably the Sahara desert. They were first reported in the early fifties, and during the next decades more sites were discovered, all of them around Wadi Guirchi, until a total of six. The figures have been traditionally interpreted as women with steatopygia (accumulation of fat in and around the buttocks) -significantly, the local name of Niola Doa means “the Dancing Maidens”-, although in most of the cases it is not clear whether they represent females or males They present exceptionally decorated bodies with geometric patterns. It is not clear if the figures are dressed (the geometric patterns representing the clothes) or if they are naked in which case the geometric patterns would correspond to tattoos or maybe corporal painting. Steatopygic depictions are not unknown in African rock art, with known examples in other parts of the Ennedi Plateau but also in Egypt and Sudan, and they occasionally appear incised in pottery in these two countries, too.

    The Ennedi Plateau is located at the north-eastern corner of Chad, on the southern edge of the Sahara Desert. It is a sandstone massif carved by erosion in a series of superimposed terraces, alternating plains and ragged cliffs crossed by seasonal rivers (wadis). Unlike other areas in the Sahara with rock art engravings or paintings, the Ennedi Plateau receives rain regularly –if scarce- during the summer, and thus it is a more benign environment to human life that other areas placed to the north, as the Messak plateau, the Tassili or the Tibesti Mountains. However, its position far from the main trade routes made its rock art being unknown to Europe until the 1930’s, when Burthe d’Annelet gave notice of them and De Saint-Floris published the first paper on the subject. The main effort to document this rock art came in 1956-1957 when Gerard Bailloud documented more than 500 rock art sites within an area of just one sixth of the entire plateau.

    The depictions in the Ennedi Plateau can be broadly organized in the same periods and styles of the rest of Saharan rock art areas. Therefore, three main periods have been documented: the so-called archaic period –representing wild animals-, the bovine period (which has domestic cattle as the predominant animal) and a third, late period named the dromedary or camel period. However, there are several slight regional differences with respect to other Saharan regions. The first one is the absence of differentiated Horse and Camel periods: in the Ennedi depictions both animals appear together, and thus they are included in a generic dromedary period (although horses were introduced earlier than dromedaries in the Sahara). Secondly, the oldest engravings in the Ennedi Plateau are much more modern than those to the north, starting to appear at the 5th-4th millennia BC. Finally, the numerous cliffs and gorges at the Ennedi Plateau house depictions of numerous local styles, sometimes contemporary to others, sometimes corresponding to successive periods. That variability means an enormous richness of techniques, themes and artistic conventions, with some of the most original depictions in Saharan rock art. Paintings are dominant in the sample, although engravings are relatively common in the area.

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  • Location

    Not on display

  • Subjects

  • Associated places

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2013

  • Department

    Africa, Oceania & the Americas

  • Registration number

    2013,2034.6155

  • Additional IDs

    • CHAENP0010029 (TARA number)
Digital photograph (colour); view of engraved rock art on a rock face showing fourteen human figures and an unidentified quadruped. Panel organized around seven outlined (pecked) women of different sizes. The bigger four are upright facing left, arm to the right outstretched. Arm to the left bent holding a stick over the shoulder, three lines (leather strips?) hanging from the side. Ears depicted, three lines coming out of the heads (headdress?). Three to the left have a horizontal, unidentified shape across the neck. Buttocks and thighs abnormally wide (steatopygia?). All figures infilled (pecked) with geometric patterns (straight and wavy lines, squares, meanders) representing garments? tattoos?. Between these four women, three smaller women with slight differences (without stick, facing right, skirts) related to the bigger ones. Right: four outlined (pecked) human figures upright, body facing front, head facing right. Arms outstretched. Top and right figures infilled (pecked) with s… (See Merlin record for full description)

Digital photograph (colour); view of engraved rock art on a rock face showing fourteen human figures and an unidentified quadruped. Panel organized around seven outlined (pecked) women of different sizes. The bigger four are upright facing left, arm to the right outstretched. Arm to the left bent holding a stick over the shoulder, three lines (leather strips?) hanging from the side. Ears depicted, three lines coming out of the heads (headdress?). Three to the left have a horizontal, unidentified shape across the neck. Buttocks and thighs abnormally wide (steatopygia?). All figures infilled (pecked) with geometric patterns (straight and wavy lines, squares, meanders) representing garments? tattoos?. Between these four women, three smaller women with slight differences (without stick, facing right, skirts) related to the bigger ones. Right: four outlined (pecked) human figures upright, body facing front, head facing right. Arms outstretched. Top and right figures infilled (pecked) with s… (See Merlin record for full description)

Reproduced by permission of the artist. © The Trustees of the British Museum

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