Collection online

cloak

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2011,6018.1

  • Description

    Cream T-shaped felt cloak with a small round neck, decorated with a silk embroidered inscription in Farsi in orange on the bottom hem and seven multi-coloured Turkmen-style tulips on the front. They are embroidered in predominantly red, dark pink and black and highlighted with yellow, blue and dark green. The piece is a reinterpretation of a traditional Iranian shepherd's cloak (namad), made for display only. Also inscribed is the date of production.

    More 

  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 2004 (1383 Hijri Shamsi (Solar))
  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 107 centimetres
    • Width: 116 centimetres (sleeve to sleeve)
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        Farsi
      • Inscription Position

        Front
      • Inscription Language

        Farsi
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Sana 1383. Az bahr dast behtar az een yadegar nist.
      • Inscription Translation

        Year 1383. There is no better souvenir than that which is made by hand.
      • Inscription Comment

        The inscription is embroidered in orange silk within a horizontal band across the bottom of the piece. The artist's signature is placed at the end of the inscription and is composed of the letter 'B' in Farsi in mirror image.The date 1383 corresponds to the Hijri Shamsi solar year (i.e. 2004).
  • Curator's comments

    This piece belongs to the artist's very first series of felt objects from the 'A Persian Journey in Felt Series'. The tulip flowers featured on the design were inspired by traditional embroideries on late-19th and early 20th-century Turkmen textiles. Ghezelayagh chose only one flower pattern and repeated it seven times on the piece. It was produced by Ghezelayagh in Tehran in 2004. The felt was produced in Luristan, western Iran.


    Bita Ghezelayagh (b.1966)
    Bita Ghezelayagh trained as an architect in Paris and worked in building restoration and interior design in Tehran. She has also served as a collaborating art director on several notable Iranian films. She now works between London and Tehran. Ghezelayagh started working with felt in 2004 following her field research with indigenous felt-makers in Luristan, western Iran. She believes that felt embodies qualities such as simplicity and resilience, which are often disregarded in Iran’s march to modernity. In 2011, she was shortlisted for the prestigious Jameel Prize of contemporary art.

    More 

  • Location

    Not on display

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2011

  • Acquisition notes

    Deposited 16/06/11 (number: 832)

  • Department

    Middle East

  • Registration number

    2011,6018.1

Cream T-shaped felt cloak with a small round neck, decorated with a silk embroidered inscription in Farsi in orange on the bottom hem and seven multi-coloured Turkoman-style tulips on the front. The tulip designs were inspired by traditional embroideries on 19th-century turkoman shawls. They are embroidered in predominantly red, dark pink and black and highlighted with yellow, blue and dark green. The piece is a reinterpretation of a traditional Iranian shepherd's cloak (namad), made for display only. Also inscribed is the date of production.

Cream T-shaped felt cloak with a small round neck, decorated with a silk embroidered inscription in Farsi in orange on the bottom hem and seven multi-coloured Turkoman-style tulips on the front. The tulip designs were inspired by traditional embroideries on 19th-century turkoman shawls. They are embroidered in predominantly red, dark pink and black and highlighted with yellow, blue and dark green. The piece is a reinterpretation of a traditional Iranian shepherd's cloak (namad), made for display only. Also inscribed is the date of production.

Image description

Recommend


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about this object, please email: collectiondatabase@britishmuseum.org 

View open data for this object with SPARQL endpoint

Object reference number: RRM42511

British Museum collection data is also available in the W3C open data standard, RDF, allowing it to join and relate to a growing body of linked data published by organisations around the world.

View this object

Support the Museum:
donate online

The Museum makes its collection database available to be used by scholars around the world. Donations will help support curatorial, documentation and digitisation projects.

About the database

The British Museum collection database is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added every week.

More about the database 

Supporters

Work on this database is supported by a range of sponsors, donors and volunteers.

More about supporters and how you
can help  

Loading...