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brick

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    90136

  • Description

    Fired clay brick; Nebuchadnezzar II no. 40; cuneiform inscription stamped on face in three lines; also has a stamped Aramaic inscription and two double ridges across each edge of the brick.

  • Authority

  • Culture/period

  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 33.5 centimetres
    • Width: 32.5 centimetres
    • Depth: 8 centimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Position

        edge
      • Inscription Language

        Aramaic
      • Inscription Translation

        Zabina
      • Inscription Comment

        Stamped Aramaic inscription published in CIS II/1 pl. IV no. 55.
      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        cuneiform
      • Inscription Position

        face
      • Inscription Language

        Babylonian
      • Inscription Transliteration

        (1) {d}AG – NÍG.DU – URÙ LUGAL KÁ.DINGIR.RA{ki} za-nin
        (2) é-sag-íla u é-zi-da IBILA SAG.KAL
        (3) ša {d}AG – A – URÙ LUGAL KÁ.DINGIR.RA{ki}
      • Inscription Comment

        Nebuchadnezzar II no. 40. Stamped inscription on face in three lines.
  • Curator's comments

    Many thousands of the king’s bricks bore a message with his name and titles. The huge demand for them led to the revival of brick stamps, in which a cuneiform
    inscription cut in reverse would produce a readable text when applied to the damp clay of the brick. One of the workmen, Zabina’, has spelled his name in Aramaic
    alphabetic letters before the clay dried: zbn’.

    P – CIS II/1, pl. IV no. 54; C – VS 1 48; T & Tr – Langdon, VAB 4, 202-3 nr. 40; B – Berger, AOAT 4/1, 179-182, and de Meyer, Tell ed-Der II 157; Pr – Babylon, Cutha, Isin, Sippar, Seleucia, Susa and Tell ed-Der.

    Measurements given in CBF Walker (1981), 'Cuneiform Brick Inscriptions in the British Museum': 35/32 x 35/31.5 x 8/7 cm (indicates range of sizes attested on the Nebuchadnezzar no. 40 bricks catalogued).

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  • Bibliography

    • Walker 1981a 101 bibliographic details
    • Guide 1922 p.176 bibliographic details
    • British Museum 2011a p.189, cat.163 bibliographic details
  • Location

    On display: G55/dc6

  • Exhibition history

    2013 - 2014 22 June - 6 Jan, Toronto, Royal Ontario Museum, 'Mesopotamia, Inventing Our World'

    2013: 30 Jan-13 May, Museum of History, Hong Kong, 'The Wonders of Ancient Mesopotamia'

    2012: 4 May-7 Oct, Melbourne Museum, 'The Wonders of Ancient Mesopotamia'

    2011 28 March-26 June, Abu Dhabi, Manarat Al Saadiyat, 'Splendours of Mesopotamia'
    2008-2009 13 Nov-15 Mar, BM, G35, 'Babylon: Myth and Reality'

  • Condition

    Fair

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition notes

    This registration was given to all bricks in the British Museum's collection which had BM numbers but no identifiable registration, except for those lately registered in the 75-7-25 collection. Almost all of them will have been acquired in the 19th century, since the numbers in the series BM 90000-90825 seem to have been allocated in the late 1890's.

  • Department

    Middle East

  • BM/Big number

    90136

  • Registration number

    1979,1220.64

  • Additional IDs

    • br.122 (exhibition number)
Clay brick; Nebuchadnezzar II no. 40; cuneiform inscription stamped on face in three lines; also has a stamped Aramaic inscription and two double ridges across each edge of the brick.

Clay brick; Nebuchadnezzar II no. 40; cuneiform inscription stamped on face in three lines; also has a stamped Aramaic inscription and two double ridges across each edge of the brick.

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Object reference number: WCO93032

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