Silver badge of Thomas Becket on a horse.

Event information

26 Apr 2021

18.30–19.30

Online event

16+

Please note this is an online event and will require you to use the video conferencing system Zoom.

These events are free however donations are greatly appreciated.

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In this introductory lecture, curators Naomi Speakman and Lloyd de Beer provide insight into the new exhibition Thomas Becket: murder and the making of a saint.

Marking the 850th anniversary of his brutal murder, the exhibition explores Becket's remarkable life, death and legacy. It presents his journey from a merchant's son to an archbishop, and the attempts to obliterate his cult under the Tudor dynasty.

Together, Speakman and de Beer will discuss how this exhibition brings his story to life and showcase highlight objects on display.

To attend this online event

Join the discussion from 18.15 on Monday 26 April. We're hosting the event on Zoom, a free video conferencing system.

Once you've accessed this event, one of the Membership team will be ready to greet you and explain how to ask questions and take part. After the initial presentation and discussion, we'll be inviting questions from the audience.

If you have any queries relating to the event or need help, please email us at friends@britishmuseum.org

Please note, once maximum capacity is reached on Zoom, Members can watch the event streamed on YouTube and will be redirected from the same 'Join the discussion' link. A recording of the event will be circulated shortly afterwards in a Members' email.

About the speakers

Dr Naomi Speakman is Curator of the Late Medieval European Collections, covering material from 10501500. She has a particular interest in ivory carvings, jewellery and the history of collecting. She completed her PhD on 19th-century collecting and reception of medieval ivories at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

Lloyd de Beer

Dr Lloyd de Beer is the Ferguson Curator of Medieval Europe. He is an expert on medieval sculpture but his interests are broad and wide-ranging. His recent publications include articles on English alabasters in Demark, the St Stephen's wall paintings from Westminster Palace and an edited volume on seals and their status in the Middle Ages. He is currently working on a monograph titled English Medieval Alabaster Sculpture: Imagery, Trade, Iconoclasm, Reuse.