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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Pyramidion

Maidstone Museum & Bentlif Art Gallery 
14 February – 14 June 2014

Sikh Akali-Nihang turban

Recommend this exhibition

Prior to the long term redevelopment of Maidstone Museum & Bentlif Art Gallery’s Egyptian Gallery, a taste of ancient Egypt will travel to the Museum in the form of a Spotlight loan of a 7th century BC pyramidion.

The capstone of a small Egyptian pyramid, which stood over the tomb of a wealthy official named Wedjahor, the pyramidion is carved with scenes of mummification and the afterlife. In one of them, the deceased kneels in worship before the god Osiris, king of the underworld, his consort Isis and four gods who protected the deceased’s vital organs. On two other sides he worships aspects of the sun god, seated on solar barques. On the fourth side the deceased’s corpse is shown being embalmed by the jackal-headed god Anubis, with his organs placed in jars beneath the bier, and with the goddesses Isis and Nephthys mourning his death.

Maidstone Museum’s own Egyptian collection includes a number of fascinating artefacts, including the mummy of a lady named Ta-kesh, daughter of the Doorkeeper of Osiris, Pa-muta (25th – early 26th Dynasty). Maidstone Museum also still owns a coffin lid of Ta-kesh although this is not presently on display.

This Spotlight loan will be accompanied by a range of activities for the whole family and school groups.

 pyramidion

Pyramidion of Wedjahor carved with hieroglyphic inscriptions and scenes showing the deceased worshipping Osiris and solar deities, and being embalmed by Anubis. Limestone. Early 26th Dynasty, 7th century BC.