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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Hackney Hoard
A fascinating
find on display

18 April –
26 April 2011
Free

Exhibition closed

Room 41

A display of 80 gold coins minted in the United States between 1854 and 1913. They are all $20 denominations of the type known as ‘Double-Eagle’ and were discovered in the garden of a house in Hackney, north east London in 2007. They were reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

The coins are thought to have been buried in 1940 when Mr Martin Sulzbacher and his family were resident in the Hackney property. A German Jew who had fled persecution in Nazi Germany, Mr Sulzbacher was interned as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Australia. His family buried the coins in their garden. Tragically, they were killed during the Blitz and the property was destroyed.

When Mr Sulzbacher returned home he was unable to find the coins and 70 years later they were found by accident.

Mr Sulzbacher passed away in 1981 but his surviving relations were made aware of this recent discovery, and came forward to claim the coins. The Sulzbacher family has kindly given permission for the coins to be displayed at the British Museum.

 

80 gold American coins, minted between 1854 and 1913 and found in 2007
© Portable Antiquities Scheme