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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Reflecting
modern Japan:
photobooks from the post-war period

5 June – 10 August 2008
Free

Exhibition closed

Room 3

The Asahi Shimbun Displays
Objects in focus

Supported by

The display focuses on three recently acquired photobooks by leading Japanese photographers of the post-war period: Tōmatsu Shōmei (born 1930), Hosoe Eikoh (born 1933) and Homma Takashi (born 1962).

Photobooks are sequences of pictures bound together to tell a story. The three featured in this display are shown together with contextual images from the archives of The Asahi Shimbun, Japan’s leading newspaper. Each pair of images explores a key theme of everyday life in post-war and contemporary Japan.

The images featured in the slideshow are all taken from Hosoe Eikoh's photobook Kamaitachi, just one of the featured books in the display.

Further information

Read the full press release

Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #6, 1965
  • 1

    Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #6, 1965. © Hosoe Eikoh

  • 2

    Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #5, 1965. © Hosoe Eikoh

  • 3

    Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #8, 1965. © Hosoe Eikoh

  • 4

    Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #12, 1968. © Hosoe Eikoh

  • 5

    Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #13, 1965. © Hosoe Eikoh

  • 6

    Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #17, 1965. © Hosoe Eikoh

  • 7

    Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #32, 1965. © Hosoe Eikoh

  • 8

    Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #37, 1965. © Hosoe Eikoh

Photograph by Hosoe Eikoh: Kamaitachi #6, 1965. © Hosoe Eikoh