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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

From Egypt to London

30 March – 30 December 1972
Free

Exhibition closed

Contents

Sponsored by The Times and The Sunday Times newspapers

In 1967, Egypt's President Nasser consented to a loan of objects from Tutankhamun's tomb to the British Museum. The exhibition date was set for 1972, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the discovery of
the tomb.

Among the star objects chosen for the exhibition were the gilded wooden statuette of Tutankhamun harpooning, the small gilded shrine and the gold mask from the head of the king’s mummy.

The objects were carefully assessed in Cairo before being packed in airfreight crates and flown to England. The gold mask, together with the other objects of the highest value, travelled in a special high-security consignment on board a Royal Air Force plane.

A whole suite of galleries on the upper floor of the British Museum was vacated (the former Ethnography galleries, now Rooms 41 and 49 – 52) and new display cases installed to receive the objects. Most of the exhibits were displayed individually so they could be seen from all sides.

Instructions for the reception of the treasures by air freight and their transportation to the British Museum

Instructions for the reception of the treasures by air freight and their transportation to the British Museum.