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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Gems of Chinese painting:
a voyage along the Yangzi River

3 April – 31 August 2014
Free

Recommend this exhibition

Discover the beauty and culture of south-east China in this selection of paintings dating from the 6th to the 19th centuries. The display includes the famous Admonitions Scroll (from 5 June) and examples of rare ceramics from the region.

The Yangzi River runs through an area of south-east China known as Jiangnan (literally 'south of the river') that has been one of the country’s most prosperous and culturally productive regions. The paintings and ceramics in the exhibition reflect the diverse life of its inhabitants, such as the elegant literati scholars and wealthy merchants, as well as fishermen and farmers. Landscape paintings from along the Yangzi River show lush, fertile fields and rolling hills and highlight the region’s famous gardens. Paintings and ceramics from Jiangnan have shaped in great part our image of traditional China.

Jiangnan is also a region where some of the finest examples of the Chinese concept of the three arts – poetry, calligraphy and painting – were produced. It is the home of China’s patriarchs of calligraphy and painting, including Gu Kaizhi (c. 344–406).

The famous Admonitions Scroll, traditionally attributed to Gu Kaizhi, is an early example for the combination of the three arts. It is one of the most important Chinese paintings to survive anywhere in the world. Due to its fragility and for conservation reasons, it is rarely shown and will now be on display in the exhibition between 5 June and 16 July. After this you will be able to see a digital version of the scroll on an interactive touchscreen.

Xiang Shengmo (1597–1658), Reading in the Autumn Mountains. Ming dynasty, 1623.


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