Defining beauty
the body in ancient Greek art

26 March – 5 July 2015

Sponsored by

Julius Baer logo

Additional support
In memory of Melvin R Seiden
Mrs Jayne Wrightsman, OBE

This exhibition
is now closed


Sponsored by

Julius Baer logo

Additional support
In memory of Melvin R Seiden
Mrs Jayne Wrightsman, OBE

This exhibition is now closed

 

Focusing on the human body, this major exhibition allowed visitors to experience the brilliance and diversity of ancient Greek art.

For centuries the ancient Greeks experimented with ways of representing the human body, both as an object of beauty and a bearer of meaning.

The remarkable works of art in the exhibition ranged from abstract simplicity of prehistoric figurines to breathtaking realism in the age of Alexander the Great. These works continued to inspire artists for hundreds of years, giving form to thought and shaping our own perceptions of ourselves.

'The chief forms of beauty are order, symmetry and clear delineation’ – Aristotle

'In portraying ideal types of beauty... you bring together from many models the most beautiful features of each' – Socrates

Marble statue of a discus-thrower (discobolus) by Myron. Roman copy of a bronze Greek original of the 5th century BC.

Marble statue of a naked Aphrodite crouching at her bath, also known as Lely’s Venus. Roman copy of a Greek original, 2nd century AD. Lent by Her Majesty the Queen.

Image captions:

Marble statue of a discus-thrower (discobolus) by Myron. Roman copy of a bronze Greek original of the 5th century BC.
Marble statue of a naked Aphrodite crouching at her bath, also known as Lely’s Venus. Roman copy of a Greek original, 2nd century AD. Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015.


Recommend this exhibition