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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Your support: success stories
Bequest from the estate of the late Mr Kenneth Day

 Copper alloy radiate of Carausius, AD 286-293

Copper alloy radiate of Carausius, AD 286-293

The British Museum’s Department of Coins and Medals curates one of the world’s great public collections of ancient and medieval coinage.

In addition, the Museum also provides expertise and support for the statutory Treasure process in England and Wales where new and exciting discoveries regularly come to light.

Collecting archaeological coin finds of British importance can be a very expensive undertaking and this was recognised by the late Mr Kenneth Day in a substantial bequest he made to the Museum. A retired engineer, Mr Day was also a keen collector and a long serving officer in the Kingston-upon-Thames Numismatic Society. He forged strong contacts with the British Museum and had been a benefactor for a number of years, donating many ancient and modern British coins over the last decade. In doing so he recognised the British Museum's additional function beyond passive custodianship of national heritage. For the Department of Coins and Medals’ continued relevance as a ‘living catalogue’ reference collection for scholars and the general public, the collection of new material is vital.

The final monument to his public spirit is seen in the form of major philanthropy; the bequest of a large sum of money raised from his estate. Two causes had been of particular interest to Mr Day, collecting coins important to British history and making them as widely available to others as possible. His legacy, therefore, will support two funds run by the department:

  • • The British Coin Fund, which ensures important new discoveries are represented in the British Museum’s collection.
  • • The digitisation project, to update and improve database records (available to all online) and create digital images – an essential part of the British Museum’s living catalogue in the twenty-first century.

More success stories

Gold Royal Geographical Society medal

Acceptance in Lieu

Medals awarded to Scott of the Antarctic, acquired through the Acceptance in Lieu Scheme.

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Special event at the Museum

BP

The Museum’s most longstanding corporate partner, supporting the public programme since 1996.

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Curator talk at the Museum

John Lyon’s Charity

A unique project bringing young people and Museum curators together to explore objects.

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Contact

For more information about supporting the Museum, contact development@britishmuseum.org  or call +44 (0)20 7323 8933

White ink drawing based upon the architectural design of muqarnas

Maryam and Edward Eisler

Maryam and Edward Eisler provided significant funding to help the Museum expand its Middle East collection.

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 Samsung Digital Discovery Centre

Samsung

A Digital Discovery Centre that enables children to bring world history to life through technology.

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WCEC

WCEC

A new building project transforming the way the Museum displays, studies and cares for its collection.

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Silver seal matrix set with a red jasper Roman intaglio showing the emperor Antoninus Pius

Dr John H Rassweiler

Supporting the care, research and public understanding of the museum’s collection of medieval seal matrices.

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Wolfson Foundation

The Lord Leonard and Lady Estelle Wolfson Foundation

Supporting accessible learning programmes at the British Museum

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