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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Maggs Bros (Biographical details)

Maggs Bros (dealer/auction house; British; c.1853; founded)

Also known as

Maggs Bros

Address

50 Berkeley Square, London W1J 5BA.

Biography

Dealers in rare books and manuscripts. Founded by Uriah Maggs c. 1853 in Westbourne Terrace and later in Paddington Church Street as a general stationer's, newsagent's and bookseller's business; by 1870 specialising in "Second-Hand Books, Ancient and Modern, in all Classes of Literature." When Uriah Maggs retired in 1894 his sons Benjamin (d. 1935) and Henry took over the business; they were later joined by their brothers, Charles and Ernest (d. 1955).1901, moved to the Strand; 1918, to 34/35 Conduit Street (a bookshop designed partly as a replica of a monastic library with custom-made furniture, much of it re-used at their next premises); 1938, to 50 Berkeley Square. There was a branch in Paris from around 1933 until the 1950's (interrupted by the removal of much of the stock to Germany in 1940), first at 140 Boulevard Haussman and later at the Rue de la Boëtie, overseen by Dr. Maurice Ettinghausen. The business was run in the mid 20th century by Clifford, Frank and Kenneth (cousins as well as brothers) and at the beginning of the 21st century by the following generation of the family, John, Bryan and Edward Maggs (information from www.maggs.com )
The firm's trade extended to cuneiform tablets, a number of which were deposited for identification in The British Museum during the 1960s (WAA deposit book entries 1328, 1583-84, 1592; dated 6/4/60, 10/4/63, 23/4/63, 2/5/63).