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J Lewis Marks (Biographical details)

J Lewis Marks (publisher/printer; printmaker; British; Male; c.1796 - 1855)

Also known as

Marks, J Lewis; Marks, John Lewis; Marks, Lewis

Address

2 Sandys Row, Artillery Street, Bishopsgate (1817-20) 37 Princes Street, Soho (1820) 28 Fetter Lane, Fleet Street (1820) 163 Piccadilly, nearly opposite Bond St / 2 doors from St James's Street (1821) 23 Russell Court, Covent Garden (1822) 17 Artillery Street (or Lane), Bishopsgate (1824) 6 Worship Street, Finsbury Square (1832) 91 Long Lane, Smithfield (1832-55)

Biography

Caricaturist, recorded in George as working between 1814 and 1832, though his career went on much longer. He initially worked for other publishers (especially Tegg), but later more usually published his works himself. Earliest works signed as Lewis Marks, later ones as J Lewis Marks. Unsigned works published by him always seem to have been etched (or occasionally lithographed) by himself.
McManus and Snowman quote census and other records indicating that Marks took over the Portland Arms public house at No.2 Long Lane in 1849, and that he was described as a "victualler and publisher" aged 55 at that address in 1851; in 1841 he had been living at no. 91 Long Lane with his wife Sarah, aged 35 and nine other members of the family, Rachel, Jacob (an engraver), Isaac, Hannah, Maria, Louisa, Nathaniel and Benjamin, aged between 19 and 3) as well as a three-day old son.
His will (dated 13 March 1855 and proved on 26 April 1855) gives his address as 91 Long Lane, Smithfield. Marks's stock in trade and the goodwill of his business was to be disposed of; his wife, Sarah, was to receive a life interest, and his children, Benjamin, David and Mary, were to receive equal shares of their father's estate on reaching the age of 21; there is no mention of other children.. Executors were Thomas Poole Parker of Maiden Lane and George Gent (?) of 5 Long Lane; witnesses were Joseph Hill (a whip maker of 86 Long Lane) and Lorenz Weigand.
The business was continued by his widow Sarah and her children until at least 1893. See sv. S Marks & Sons. Trade card in Heal Collection (Heal,99.80) advertises "J.L. Marks, Engraver & Printer in General. 17, Artillery Street, Bishopsgate, London. Drawing & Painting on Stone. Engraving on Steel. Aquatinting tastefully Executed. Map and Print Colouring. Engraving on Wood by H. Marks."

Bibliography

Vic Gatrell, 'City of Laughter', 2006, p.505
C McManus and J Snowman, "A Left-handed Compliment", in "The Right Hand and the Left Hand of History (Psychology Press, 2010)
Valerie Fairbrass, 'Print Quarterly', XXIX 2012, pp.55-6 (information from his will, PROB 11/2210)