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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Christopher Ironside (Biographical details)

Christopher Ironside (designer; British; 1913 - 1992)

Also known as

Ironside, Christopher

Biography

Painter, draughtsman, designer, designer of coins and medals, teacher
Born in London in 1913, the younger brother of Robin Ironside (q.v.). Studied at the Central School of Arts and Crafts. During WWII he served in the Directorate of Camoflague in the Air Ministry, based in Lemington Spa and afterwards worked for the Ministry of Town and Country Planning. From 1946 to 48 he worked at the Council for Industrial Design. He shared two exhibitions with his brother: at the Redfern Gallery in 1944 and Arthur Jeffress in 1960. They also collaborated on designs for postage stamps and the stage, including the Covent Garden production of 'Sylvia' in 1952. He taught at Maidstone College of Art and at the Royal College of Art, 1953-63. He designed decorations in the Mall for the Coronation in 1953. He became a Fellow of the Society of Industrial Artists and Designers [FSIAD] in 1970. He was appointed OBE in 1971 for his designs for the obverse of the new UK decimal coinage. This led to commissions for new coinage for Tanzania, Brunei, Quatar Dubai and Singapore. His first wife was Janey Ironside, Professor of Fashion at the RCA, and their daughter is the journalist Virginia Ironside. He died in Winchester, Hampshire in 1992. His work is held in the British Museum, including designs for coins and medals and the 1971 decimal coinage.

Bibliography

Richard Guyatt: 'Christopher Ironside' Obituary Independent 15 July 1992