Kunukaurqo

 

Project team

  • Nick Branch, Senior Lecturer in Palaeoecology, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010) 
  • Francisco Ferreira, PhD student, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway
    University of London (01/01/2007 - 01/01/2010)
  • Millena Frouin, Post doctoral research assistant, Department of Geography,
    Royal Holloway University of London (19/03/2007 - 28/02/2009)
  • Rob Kemp, Professor, Physical Geography, Department of Geography,
    Royal Holloway University of London (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010)
  • Colin McEwan, Head of the Americas section and curator of Latin American collections, Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, British Museum, London (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010)
  • Frank Meddens, Honorary Research Associate, Department of Geography,
    Royal Holloway University of London (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010)
  • Gabriel Ramon, Post-doctoral research assistant, British Museum, London
    (01/04/2008 - 26/02/2010)
  • Cirilo Vivanco, Professor of Archaeology, National University of San Cristóbal of Huamanga, Peru
  • Katie Willis, Reader, Development Geography, Department of Geography,
    Royal Holloway University of London (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010)

Partners

  • University of Reading
  • Royal Holloway University of London
  • Universidad Nacional de San Cristobal de Huamanga

Supported by

Arts and Humanities Research Council
  • Arts and Humanities Research Council

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Three carved stone channels on the top tier project over the side of the platform. This suggests the draining of liquids and is of considerable significance considering the frequent references in literature to the use of this type of platform with a ritual of pouring drinks as an offering to the sun god.

Views of the remains at Kunuquarqo
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    1. Views of the remains at Kunuquarqo.

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    2. Artefacts found at the site.

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    3. Artefacts found at the site.

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    4. Views of the remains at Kunuquarqo.

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    5. Views of the remains at Kunuquarqo.

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    6. Views of the remains at Kunuquarqo.

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    7. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    8. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    9. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    10. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    11. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    12. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    13. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    14. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    15. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    16. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

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    17. Sequence of images showing the view from the platform.

 

This is a two tier platform, with the top level measuring 17.22m x 9.19m and the lower level 23.17m x 14.0m. The upper level is built of mid grey andesite incorporating white andesite stones which are arranged in a manner which suggests they may have formed a figurative pattern. The lower tier had some limited indications for the use of stone brackets (corbels) along the top. It has a small staircase with six steps centrally placed along its narrow north face. The nature of the stonework and shape of the structure indicate it dates to the Late Horizon and is in the Inca cultural tradition.

An unimpeded distant horizon is visible along the eastern and western horizon profiles, whereas the rising ground to the south and north gives a more restricted view in these directions.

A single test pit measuring 2m x 2m was excavated in the southwest corner of the top tier of the platform, exposing interior walls, which were built straight onto the underlying grey andesite bedrock.

Research focus at Kunukaurqo