Condormarca

 

Project team

  • Nick Branch, Senior Lecturer in Palaeoecology, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010) 
  • Francisco Ferreira, PhD student, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway
    University of London (01/01/2007 - 01/01/2010)
  • Millena Frouin, Post doctoral research assistant, Department of Geography,
    Royal Holloway University of London (19/03/2007 - 28/02/2009)
  • Rob Kemp, Professor, Physical Geography, Department of Geography,
    Royal Holloway University of London (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010)
  • Colin McEwan, Head of the Americas section and curator of Latin American collections, Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, British Museum, London (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010)
  • Frank Meddens, Honorary Research Associate, Department of Geography,
    Royal Holloway University of London (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010)
  • Gabriel Ramon, Post-doctoral research assistant, British Museum, London
    (01/04/2008 - 26/02/2010)
  • Cirilo Vivanco, Professor of Archaeology, National University of San Cristóbal of Huamanga, Peru
  • Katie Willis, Reader, Development Geography, Department of Geography,
    Royal Holloway University of London (01/01/2007 - 26/02/2010)

Partners

  • University of Reading
  • Royal Holloway University of London
  • Universidad Nacional de San Cristobal de Huamanga

Supported by

Arts and Humanities Research Council
  • Arts and Humanities Research Council

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The site of Condormarca, thought to be named after the now damaged condor carved into a nearby rock face, is located on the southern margin of the village of Huamanguilla, the first Spanish capital of the department of Ayacucho.

Views of the remains at Condormarca
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    1. Views of the remains at Condormarca.

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    2. Views of the remains at Condormarca.

 

The ushnu is located on a hill and spur rising up from the valley floor on the eastern side of the Ayacucho basin. The site was extensively damaged in the 1980s after people displaced by internal political unrest reused the ancient stone to rebuild their houses.

Descriptions indicate that the north east (the higher side) of the site was made up of a plaza with two great halls or kallanka on the north and south sides and two more square structures at the south-western end. Locals say a relatively late colonial or republican cemetery was located in this part of the site.

Research focus at Condormarca