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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Sloane's Treasures

Project team

Partners


British Library     Natural History Museum

Supported by


Arts and Humanities Research Council

An Arts and Humanities Research Council 'Science in Culture Exploratory Award

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About the project

Sloane’s Treasures is an AHRC ‘Science in Culture’ Exploratory Award to develop future cross-disciplinary research projects on Sloane’s collection. Projects will bring together academics, librarians, curators, and other experts from the arts, humanities and sciences, in a dialogue on crucial science and culture questions relating to the collections.

The project will create an advisory group and hold a series of three workshops with invited international attendees to address specific issues such as: methods of transcribing, digitizing and cataloguing Sloane’s own manuscript catalogues of his collections of natural history, cultural objects and books; the potential not only for academic research but also for diverse public engagement, access and understanding; new ways of using new technology to reconstruct and reconnect the past across the sciences and humanities.

This project is an initial exploratory phase of a much larger future research project, Reconstructing Sloane, which eventually aims to digitize and catalogue his collections across the three institutions and even further and to identify and link Sloane’s networks of contacts, in order to help us understand how knowledge was formed and exchanged through objects in the early modern world and the implications this has for us today.

More about project developments
and progress 

 Hans Sloane's specimen tray

Hans Sloane's specimen tray.
© 2003 The Natural History Museum