What just happened?

To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Money in Africa

Understanding
the past and present
of a continent

Project leader

Supported by

The Leverhulme Trust


Arts and Humanities Research Council

Share this project

Partnerships

The project has been working to develop resources to support curators in museums around the world who have responsibility for a money collection, but who might not be specialists.

The Money in Africa project team have developed partnerships with colleagues in money museums, and in museums with significant numismatic collections.

These include:

  • ABSA Bank Money Museum, Johannesburg
  • Iziko Museums, Capetown
  • Money Museum of the Bank al’Maghrib,
    Rabat, Morocco
  • Money Museum of the Bank of
    Uganda, Kampala
  • National Museum of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa

European and international institutions and organisations, including Royal Coin Cabinet in Stockholm Sweden; the Money Museum in Utrecht, Netherlands; FIDEM (International Art Medal Federation), and members of ICOMON (International Committee of Money and Banking Museums) are working to develop this international network.

World Collections Programme

As part of this three-year programme of international collaborations, the Money in Africa team worked with colleagues in Ethiopia and South Africa. Sharing of expertise through these partnerships enabled staff at the British Museum to learn more about our collection, as well as supporting cataloguing and digital imaging programmes in our partner museums.

British Museum curator, Amelia Dowler at the National Museum of Ethiopia

British Museum curator, Amelia Dowler at the National Museum of Ethiopia.