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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Jewellery and men in Tudor and Jacobean England

Project team

Department of Prehistory and Europe 

Partners

  • Professor Evelyn Welch, Queen Mary,
    University of London

Supported by

Arts and Humanities Research Council

An Arts and Humanities Research Council
Collaborative Doctoral Award

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Study Day – Expressions: Jewellery in the Early Modern Period

On 20 January 2012 museum professionals, academics, and contemporary practitioners participated in a half-day conference on early modern jewellery at the British Museum. The aim was to discuss and debate current scholarship in the field.

Papers reflected the range of work being undertaken on this subject:

'Those wonderful Spitzer boys': "Renaissance" Jewellery production in Paris and Aachen 1850-1900
Charles Truman, independent consultant and dealer

The trade in precious materials to Northern Europe in the Age of Reconnaissance
David Humphrey, Royal College of Art

The jewellery trade in London 1570-1620: transfer of skill from Antwerp and Paris
David Mitchell, Centre for Metropolitan History, University of London

The Cheapside Hoard
Hazel Forsyth, Museum of London

Diamonds, debt and diplomacy: the career of Isaac Le Gouch, jeweller to Charles II
Maria Hayward, University of Southampton

Taking inspiration from Renaissance jewellery: a display at the British Museum
Joseph Langshaw, Bishopsland

The study day was kindly sponsored by the Design History Society and the Society for Renaissance Studies.

Gold ring set with a point-cut diamond and enamelled on the shoulders

Gold ring set with a point-cut diamond and enamelled on the shoulders. Italy, 15th century