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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Project team and acknowledgements

  • Richie Abel, Department of Mineralogy, Natural History Museum
  • Nick Ashton, Department of Britain, Europe and Prehistory, British Museum
  • G. Russell Coope (Insects),  School of Earth Sciences, University of Birmingham
  • Mike H. Field (Palaeobotany – plant macrofossils), Department of Archaeology, Leiden University
  • Rowena Gale (Palaeobotany – wood), Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • Peter G. Hoare (Geology), School of Geosciences, University of Sydney
  • Nigel R. Larkin (Vertebrates), Natural History Department, Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service
  • Mark D. Lewis (Pollen and spores), Department of Palaeontology, Natural History Museum
  • Simon G. Lewis (Geology), Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London
  • Vassil Karloukovski (Palaeomagnetism), Centre for Environmental Magnetism and Palaeomagnetism, University of Lancaster
  • Barbara A. Maher (Palaeomagnetism), Centre for Environmental Magnetism and Palaeomagnetism, University of Lancaster
  • Simon A. Parfitt (Vertebrates), Institute of Archaeology, University College London and Department of Palaeontology, Natural History Museum
  • Sylvia M. Peglar (Pollen and spores)
  • Richard C. Preece (Palaeoecology, molluscs and barnacles), Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge
  • Chris B. Stringer (Palaeoanthropology), Research leader in Human Origins, Department of Palaeontology, Natural History Museum
  • John E. Whittaker (Marine microfossils), Department of Palaeontology, Natural History Museum

Tudor Bryn Jones, Claire Fisher, Sophie Hunter, Roger Jacobi, Clare Parfitt, Peter Robins, Phil Rye, Glenys Salter, Beccy Scott, Andy Shaw, Rob Symmonds,  Ian Taylor

Help in kind was provided by numerous individuals and organisations:

We thank Clive and Sue Stockton for practical support; Brian Farrow and Peter Frew (North Norfolk District Council), Edwin Couzens, the Lomax family (local landowners) and Malcolm Kerby (Coastal Concern Action Group) for permission and facilitating excavation; and John Roylance and Mark Appleford for plant hire and machining.

We also thank John Sibbick, Alex Ball, Silvia Bello, Phil Crabb and Ken Johnson (Natural History Museum), Craig Williams (British Museum), Adam Brumm, Mike Pitts and Mike Page for the figures and photographs; Richard Herrington, Chris Halls and Tony Wighton (Mineralogy Department, Natural History Museum) for thin-sections and mineral identification; Max Barclay, Marzia Breda, Susanne Feist-Burkhardt, Jonah Chitolie, Phil Gibbard, Mark Hounslow, Adrian Lister, Tom Meijer, Scott Moore-Fay, Jim Rose, Mark Spencer, Hans van Essen and Richard West for discussion about the project.

Finally, we thank all of the diggers who participated in the Happisburgh excavation.

Picture credits: Phil Crabb (Natural History Museum), Peter Hoare, Nigel Larkin, Sophie Hunter, Clare Parfitt, Mike Pitts, Mike Page and the Norwich Castle Museum.