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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

The Berber-Abidiya archaeological project

Project leader

Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan 

Partners

  • Dr Salah eldin Mohamed Ahmed, Director of Field Work, National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums, Sudan

Supported by
 

Institute for Bioarchaeology National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums, Sudan
  • Archeology4All
  • Institute for Bioarchaeology
  • Michela Schiff Giorgini Foundation of the
    United States
  • National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums, Sudan
  • Anonymous donor

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The site: conservation and site preservation

Conservation and preservation of the site form a major component of the project.

The goals are to preserve, conserve and protect the site for the future through sustainable means such as affordable, locally-sourced materials and a trained local labour force; to promote understanding of the site’s cultural significance; and ultimately to make the site and preserved archaeological structures accessible to visitors in the form of a site museum and archaeological park.

To accomplish these goals, the following principles were established: any materials used in the site’s conservation or maintenance must not be able to be confused with the ancient archaeology; all materials used must be sympathetic to the original structures and be sourced locally; and conservation work could be continued and executed by a local work force in the future, after appropriate training.

Conserving a painting of Hapy on a temple column

Conserving a painting of Hapy on a temple column