How to submit

Please send all submissions to broberts@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk (Editor) and include full contact details.

Please also supply an email address which will be published with the article, so readers can contact the author(s).

Guidelines

  • All contributions should begin with a short abstract
  • Please do not add page numbers or any other headers and footers, and avoid using underlining or words in bold. Italics are sufficient for emphasizing, e.g. non-English words or phrases. The number of heading levels should be limited to two, or three at the most
  • Illustrations should be submitted fully completed and should be of good quality and in digital format (jpg or tiff, uncompressed, minimum 600 dpi, line drawings 1200dpi)
  • Following the method of quotation for scientific texts, literature references should appear in running text in the following form in brackets: (Binford 1962: 65; Renfrew 1972: 80-85)
  • General references without page numbers should be avoided and are only permitted if the complete work is referred to. Page references such as 75ff. etc are not permitted 
  • At the end of the text a bibliography should be provided in which all quoted titles are recorded
  • No abbreviations in the bibliography.

Guide to referencing

Monographs and anthologies:

Appadurai, A. (ed.) 1986. The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Rowlands, M., Larsen, L.,  and Kristiansen, K.  1987. Centre and Periphery in the Ancient World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Essays in anthologies:

Kristiansen, K. 1994. The Emergence of the European World System in the Bronze Age: Divergence, Convergence and Social Evolution During the First and Second Millennia BC in Europe. In K. Kristiansen and J. Jensen (eds.), Europe in the First Millennium B.C, 7-30. Sheffield Archaeological Monographs 6. Sheffield: J. R. Collis Publications.

Yoffee, N. 1993. Too Many Chiefs? (or, Safe Texts for the '90s). In N. Yoffee and A. G. Sherratt (eds.), Archaeological Theory: Who Sets the Agenda? , 60-78. New Directions in Archaeology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Essays in journals:

Binford, L.R. 1962.  Archaeology as Anthropology. American Antiquity 28, 217-225.

Hodder, I. 1989. This is Not an Article about Material Culture as Text. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 8, 250-269.

Strahm, C. 1994. Die Anfänge der Metallurgie in Mitteleuropa. Helvetia Archaeologica 97, 2-39.

Online

Bristow, P. 2001. Behaviour and belief in mortuary ritual: attitudes to the disposal of the dead in southern Britain 3500bc-AD43. Internet Archaeology 11. http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue11 /bristow_index.html

 

Bronze Age Review - the Mold gold cape

The Mold gold cape, Bronze Age, about 1900-1600 BC, from Mold, Flintshire, North Wales