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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Conservation

Treatment date
20 July 2001

Treatment proposal
Re-attach detached plaque with reversible adhesive.Check other inlays. Light surface clean. Req 76364

Condition
July 2001: During photography the gripping beast escutcheon on the lower left (as viewed from the front) had become detached. A small amount of adhesive remained on the white make-up of the support. The round stud on the lower right was slightly loose but not in immediate danger of becoming detached. The whole object was very dusty, very dirty and very greasy. The top bar of the frame is secured to the rest of the frame at each of the top corners only with adhesive. This does not provide much support and during handling the adhesive had failed and the top bar was slightly loose and moving, putting strain on the pins on the back as they pressed against the white support.

Treatment details
Req 76364 July 2001: The gold and garnets were cleaned with cotton wool swabs of variously: acetone, IMS, Detarol (n-hydroxylethyl ethylenediaminetriacetic acid,trisodium salt)(10% in water) and distilled water, as appropriate. The white make-up was cleaned with a blower bulb and sable brush followed by swabs of IMS. The escutcheon was reattached and the loose stud secured with HMG cellulose nitrate heatproof and waterproof adhesive. A packing of cotton wool soaked in HMG was inserted into the rear of the top corners between frame and top bar, to immobilise the joint.