Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

Museum number

1903,0408,0.1

Description

Detail: Other

Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

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  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons i

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Inscription

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Inscription

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Inscription

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Inscription

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Inscription

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Full: Front

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 14. Scene 7: the rejection scene (right); Scene 8: a lady meditating on her conduct (left)

    Front:Right Side

  • COMPASS Image Caption:13. Scene 6: the family group

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:12. Scene 5: the bedroom scene

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:11. Scene 4: ladies at their toilette

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:10. Scene 3: the landscape and hunter

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:9. Scene 2: a virtuous concubine refuses to ride in the imperial palanquin lest she make the emperor appear like a bad ruler (2nd section)

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:8. Scene 2: a virtuous concubine refuses to ride in the imperial palanquin lest she make the emperor appear like a bad ruler (1st section)

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:7. Scene 1: a virtuous concubine intercepts a black bear about to attack the emperor

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:6. Front border-panel of yellow brocade

    Full: Front

  • COMPASS Image Caption:5. Fragrance of a Red Reed, title-piece by the Qianlong emperor (2nd section)

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:4. Fragrance of a Red Reed, title-piece by the Qianlong emperor (1st section)

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption:3. Kesi wrapper, Song-Jin period

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 15. Scene 9: the instructress writing the admonitions

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 17. Orchid painting by the Qianlong emperor (right); Colophon transcription of the Admonitions texts by the Jin emperor Zhangzong (1st section, left)

    Front:Right Side

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 18. Colophon transcription of the Admonitions texts by the Jin emperor Zhangzong (2nd section, right); Colophon by the Qianlong emperor (1st section, left)

    Front:Right Side

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 19. Colophon by the Qianlong emperor (1st section)

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 21. Colophon by the Qianlong emperor (last section)

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 22. Colophon painting by Zou Yigui (1st section)

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 23. Colophon painting by Zou Yigui (2nd section)

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 20. Colophon by the Qianlong emperor (middle section)

    Front:Middle

  • COMPASS Image Caption: 16. Rear border-panel

    Unknown

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • COMPASS Image Caption:2. The Qianlong brocade wrapper (the title-slip is digitally reconstructed)

    Unknown

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting ink and colours on silk in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the Nushi zhen (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors. At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty kesi tapestry-woven silk depicting peonies from an old mounting of the handscroll. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see 1903.4-8.01b]). At the beginning of the handscroll is a large three-character inscription. Painting also has a mark and many seals, including seal of Qianlong; also colophons and poetical exhortations (by Zhang Hua) and an exterior label possibly written by Qianlong.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Hu

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Hu

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Recto

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Front:Middle

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Front:Middle

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Front:Middle

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Detail: Other

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuos, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nushi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress of the Ladies in the Palace), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong and Qianlong emperors (an exterior label was possibly written by the Qianlong emperor too). At the beginning is a fragment of Song dynasty 'kesi' tapestry-woven silk from an old mounting of the handscroll, depicting peonies, followed by a large three-character inscription. The scroll consists of quotations from the text by Zhang Hua, followed in each case by figure illustrations without any background or at most slight suggestions of setting. At the end of the handscroll was a landscape painting depicting trees by Zou Yigui (now mounted separately [see BM 1903.0408.01b]). Made of ink and colours on silk.  Scene seven, for example, shows a court lady advancing towards the Emperor, who repulses her with a gesture of his raised hand. The drapery is portrayed with long, continuous, even brushstrokes; movement is shown through the vitality of the swirling draperies, a continuation of Han dynasty traditions. The facial expressions of the figures have advanced beyond the generalised types of Han figures; the characterisation of facial expression is here closer to portraiture, displaying individual character and emotion.  Another scene shows a court concubine at her toilet with a maid. The concubie wears a long-sleeved wrapover robe while the maid has a separate skirt and wrapover top, and an elaborate hair ornament. A bronze mirror can be seen in use on a lacquered wood stand, as well as lacquered toilet boxes. The large lacquer box lid is inlaid with silver.

    Full: Front

  • Photograph from the Victoria & Albert Museum (scanned courtesy of Rupert Faulker) of craftsman at the Japan-British Exhibition of 1910. Sugizaki Hideaki (block-carver), whom Sidney Colvin commissioned in 1911 to produce the woodblock facsimile of the Admonitions scroll.

    Full: Front

  • Photograph from the Victoria & Albert Museum (scanned courtesy of Rupert Faulker) of craftsman at the Japan-British Exhibition of 1910. Urushibara Yoshijiro (printer), whom Sidney Colvin commissioned in 1911 to produce the woodblock facsimile of the Admonitions scroll.

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nüshi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong an

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nüshi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong an

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nüshi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong an

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nüshi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong an

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nüshi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong an

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nüshi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong an

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nüshi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong an

    Full: Front

  • Handscroll painting in nine scenes (originally eleven) illustrating the 'Nüshi zhen' (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), a text composed by Zhang Hua (c. AD 232-300). It bears many seals and long colophons in the hands of the Huizong an

    Full: Front