Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva  (?), the outer base decorated with an embossed lotus.

Museum number

1900,0209.1

Description

Full: Front

Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva (?), the outer base decorated with an embossed lotus.

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  • COMPASS Title: Bimaran Reliquary

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  • COMPASS Title: Bimaran Reliquary

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  • COMPASS Title: Bimaran Reliquary

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  • COMPASS Title: Bimaran Reliquary

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  • COMPASS Title: Bimaran Reliquary

    Unknown

  • COMPASS Title: Bimaran Reliquary;Bimaran Reliquary

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  • COMPASS Title: Bimaran Reliquary

    Unknown

  • Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva  (?), the outer base decorated with an embossed lotus. This object was contained in an inscribed, globular steatite box with a lid (OA1880.27) and was associated with a group of four posthumously issued coins of Azes (BMC Azes 196-199) dated to c.60AD.

    Group of Objects

  • Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva  (?), the outer base decorated with an embossed lotus. This object was contained in an inscribed, globular steatite box with a lid (OA1880.27) and was associated with a group of four posthumously issued coins of Azes (BMC Azes 196-199) dated to c.60AD.

    Full: Front

  • Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva  (?), the outer base deco

    Full: Front

  • Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva  (?), the outer base deco

    Full: Front

  • Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva  (?), the outer base decorated with an embossed lotus. This object was contained in an inscribed, globular steatite box with a lid (OA1880.27) and was associated with a group of four posthumously issued coins of Azes (BMC Azes 196-199) dated to c.60AD.

    Full: Front

  • Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva  (?), the outer base decorated with an embossed lotus.

    Full: Front

  • Cylindrical casket, missing its lid, made of gold inset with garnets and adorned with two repeating sequences of four caitya-shaped arches containing the figure of the Buddha flanked by Indra and Brahma, followed by a bodhisattva  (?), the outer base decorated with an embossed lotus.

    Front:Top

  • Cylindrical casket, tapering slightly towards the rim and lacking a lid. The arcading round the side consists of eight pointed 'caitya' arches resting on pilasters. Each arch has a plain recessed face and the pilaster capitals consist of a plain fillet above a torus and a fillet. The pilaster shafts have each a recessed oblong panel with an outlined border curved at the top and the base mouldings repeat those of the capitals in a contrary sequence. The compartments form two groups (A and B) of three at opposite sides to each other, each group having an almost identical central Buddha flanked by closely similar, worshipping deities in profile, and the three are separated at both ends by a single similar compartment containing the same frontal worshipping figure.  The Buddha stands frontally in slight 'dehanchement', but his left leg is flexed and its foot raised, while his right leg points sideways as if he is walking. His right hand is raised, palm outwards, to the centre of his breast in a less usual, perhaps archaic abhayamudra, while the left hand rests somewhat indistinguishably at the hip, not very clearly holding the robe which seems also to be wrapped round the wrist and falling from it; a length of the robe also appears to hang from the right arm. The neckline on Buddha A is coherently in relief, while on Buddha B it is more diffused and linear; Buddha A is generally more finely executed, a thinner and taller figure with a long oval face and a more pronounced peak of the undulating hair where the face of the other is rounder, more youthful and with a less clear moustache. On both the robe hangs with some effect of wet drapery. Both Buddhas are haloed, but on Buddha A the halo has a raised border and the u??i?a is much larger and, with the open eyes and moustache, recalls an early Buddha type in stone.  On each Buddha's left stands a haloed turbaned figure of Indra in profile, his head somewhat inclined, the left leg flexed a little backwards, the left arm, with a bracelet and armlet, raised and hand(s) joined. He wears a paridhana, and unusually the uttariya hangs front and back over his right shoulder and loops round the left waist; on figure A a short length also hangs over the left shoulder. Other differences are in the position and relief of the lower left leg and in the more abundant drapery of the uttariya on figure B.  On each Buddha's right a haloed and bearded figure of Brahma, with a large chignon and a water pot held in his left hand, walks towards the Buddha and raises his right hand no higher than the Buddha's; it is seen from the back with the fingers curved forwards. He wears a paridhana, and the uttariya over his left shoulder, with a long fluttering fall at his back, appears on the left arm and loops in the narrow mode round the right of the body. Differences between the two are the finer tooling and relief of the taller and erect figure of group A, while that of B seems more squat and has a more bowed posture; both make a distinctly classicising impression.  The haloed dividing figure is youthful and stands frontally, his flexed left leg and his right foot recalling the Buddha's stance; his hands are brought together before his breast and he wears a paridhana and uttariya with two long ends falling on each side; the uttariya crosses the body in the narrow mode from the left shoulder where it also forms a horizontal semiloop. Both arms wear an armlet and bracelets. The hair is in a chignon drawn in at its base; below it falls from a parting to form pronounced 'bouffant' locks at the sides, especially on the figure behind the Indra of group B, whose expression is much more of a beatific smile. Like that of Bu

    Detail: Other

  • Cylindrical casket, tapering slightly towards the rim and lacking a lid. The arcading round the side consists of eight pointed 'caitya' arches resting on pilasters. Each arch has a plain recessed face and the pilaster capitals consist of a plain fillet above a torus and a fillet. The pilaster shafts have each a recessed oblong panel with an outlined border curved at the top and the base mouldings repeat those of the capitals in a contrary sequence. The compartments form two groups (A and B) of three at opposite sides to each other, each group having an almost identical central Buddha flanked by closely similar, worshipping deities in profile, and the three are separated at both ends by a single similar compartment containing the same frontal worshipping figure.  The Buddha stands frontally in slight 'dehanchement', but his left leg is flexed and its foot raised, while his right leg points sideways as if he is walking. His right hand is raised, palm outwards, to the centre of his breast in a less usual, perhaps archaic abhayamudra, while the left hand rests somewhat indistinguishably at the hip, not very clearly holding the robe which seems also to be wrapped round the wrist and falling from it; a length of the robe also appears to hang from the right arm. The neckline on Buddha A is coherently in relief, while on Buddha B it is more diffused and linear; Buddha A is generally more finely executed, a thinner and taller figure with a long oval face and a more pronounced peak of the undulating hair where the face of the other is rounder, more youthful and with a less clear moustache. On both the robe hangs with some effect of wet drapery. Both Buddhas are haloed, but on Buddha A the halo has a raised border and the u??i?a is much larger and, with the open eyes and moustache, recalls an early Buddha type in stone.  On each Buddha's left stands a haloed turbaned figure of Indra in profile, his head somewhat inclined, the left leg flexed a little backwards, the left arm, with a bracelet and armlet, raised and hand(s) joined. He wears a paridhana, and unusually the uttariya hangs front and back over his right shoulder and loops round the left waist; on figure A a short length also hangs over the left shoulder. Other differences are in the position and relief of the lower left leg and in the more abundant drapery of the uttariya on figure B.  On each Buddha's right a haloed and bearded figure of Brahma, with a large chignon and a water pot held in his left hand, walks towards the Buddha and raises his right hand no higher than the Buddha's; it is seen from the back with the fingers curved forwards. He wears a paridhana, and the uttariya over his left shoulder, with a long fluttering fall at his back, appears on the left arm and loops in the narrow mode round the right of the body. Differences between the two are the finer tooling and relief of the taller and erect figure of group A, while that of B seems more squat and has a more bowed posture; both make a distinctly classicising impression.  The haloed dividing figure is youthful and stands frontally, his flexed left leg and his right foot recalling the Buddha's stance; his hands are brought together before his breast and he wears a paridhana and uttariya with two long ends falling on each side; the uttariya crosses the body in the narrow mode from the left shoulder where it also forms a horizontal semiloop. Both arms wear an armlet and bracelets. The hair is in a chignon drawn in at its base; below it falls from a parting to form pronounced 'bouffant' locks at the sides, especially on the figure behind the Indra of group B, whose expression is much more of a beatific smile. Like that of Bu

    Detail: Other

  • Cylindrical casket, tapering slightly towards the rim and lacking a lid. The arcading round the side consists of eight pointed 'caitya' arches resting on pilasters. Each arch has a plain recessed face and the pilaster capitals consist of a plain fillet above a torus and a fillet. The pilaster shafts have each a recessed oblong panel with an outlined border curved at the top and the base mouldings repeat those of the capitals in a contrary sequence. The compartments form two groups (A and B) of three at opposite sides to each other, each group having an almost identical central Buddha flanked by closely similar, worshipping deities in profile, and the three are separated at both ends by a single similar compartment containing the same frontal worshipping figure.  The Buddha stands frontally in slight 'dehanchement', but his left leg is flexed and its foot raised, while his right leg points sideways as if he is walking. His right hand is raised, palm outwards, to the centre of his breast in a less usual, perhaps archaic abhayamudra, while the left hand rests somewhat indistinguishably at the hip, not very clearly holding the robe which seems also to be wrapped round the wrist and falling from it; a length of the robe also appears to hang from the right arm. The neckline on Buddha A is coherently in relief, while on Buddha B it is more diffused and linear; Buddha A is generally more finely executed, a thinner and taller figure with a long oval face and a more pronounced peak of the undulating hair where the face of the other is rounder, more youthful and with a less clear moustache. On both the robe hangs with some effect of wet drapery. Both Buddhas are haloed, but on Buddha A the halo has a raised border and the u??i?a is much larger and, with the open eyes and moustache, recalls an early Buddha type in stone.  On each Buddha's left stands a haloed turbaned figure of Indra in profile, his head somewhat inclined, the left leg flexed a little backwards, the left arm, with a bracelet and armlet, raised and hand(s) joined. He wears a paridhana, and unusually the uttariya hangs front and back over his right shoulder and loops round the left waist; on figure A a short length also hangs over the left shoulder. Other differences are in the position and relief of the lower left leg and in the more abundant drapery of the uttariya on figure B.  On each Buddha's right a haloed and bearded figure of Brahma, with a large chignon and a water pot held in his left hand, walks towards the Buddha and raises his right hand no higher than the Buddha's; it is seen from the back with the fingers curved forwards. He wears a paridhana, and the uttariya over his left shoulder, with a long fluttering fall at his back, appears on the left arm and loops in the narrow mode round the right of the body. Differences between the two are the finer tooling and relief of the taller and erect figure of group A, while that of B seems more squat and has a more bowed posture; both make a distinctly classicising impression.  The haloed dividing figure is youthful and stands frontally, his flexed left leg and his right foot recalling the Buddha's stance; his hands are brought together before his breast and he wears a paridhana and uttariya with two long ends falling on each side; the uttariya crosses the body in the narrow mode from the left shoulder where it also forms a horizontal semiloop. Both arms wear an armlet and bracelets. The hair is in a chignon drawn in at its base; below it falls from a parting to form pronounced 'bouffant' locks at the sides, especially on the figure behind the Indra of group B, whose expression is much more of a beatific smile. Like that of Bu

    Detail: Other

  • Cylindrical casket, tapering slightly towards the rim and lacking a lid. The arcading round the side consists of eight pointed 'caitya' arches resting on pilasters. Each arch has a plain recessed face and the pilaster capitals consist of a plain fillet above a torus and a fillet. The pilaster shafts have each a recessed oblong panel with an outlined border curved at the top and the base mouldings repeat those of the capitals in a contrary sequence. The compartments form two groups (A and B) of three at opposite sides to each other, each group having an almost identical central Buddha flanked by closely similar, worshipping deities in profile, and the three are separated at both ends by a single similar compartment containing the same frontal worshipping figure.  The Buddha stands frontally in slight 'dehanchement', but his left leg is flexed and its foot raised, while his right leg points sideways as if he is walking. His right hand is raised, palm outwards, to the centre of his breast in a less usual, perhaps archaic abhayamudra, while the left hand rests somewhat indistinguishably at the hip, not very clearly holding the robe which seems also to be wrapped round the wrist and falling from it; a length of the robe also appears to hang from the right arm. The neckline on Buddha A is coherently in relief, while on Buddha B it is more diffused and linear; Buddha A is generally more finely executed, a thinner and taller figure with a long oval face and a more pronounced peak of the undulating hair where the face of the other is rounder, more youthful and with a less clear moustache. On both the robe hangs with some effect of wet drapery. Both Buddhas are haloed, but on Buddha A the halo has a raised border and the u??i?a is much larger and, with the open eyes and moustache, recalls an early Buddha type in stone.  On each Buddha's left stands a haloed turbaned figure of Indra in profile, his head somewhat inclined, the left leg flexed a little backwards, the left arm, with a bracelet and armlet, raised and hand(s) joined. He wears a paridhana, and unusually the uttariya hangs front and back over his right shoulder and loops round the left waist; on figure A a short length also hangs over the left shoulder. Other differences are in the position and relief of the lower left leg and in the more abundant drapery of the uttariya on figure B.  On each Buddha's right a haloed and bearded figure of Brahma, with a large chignon and a water pot held in his left hand, walks towards the Buddha and raises his right hand no higher than the Buddha's; it is seen from the back with the fingers curved forwards. He wears a paridhana, and the uttariya over his left shoulder, with a long fluttering fall at his back, appears on the left arm and loops in the narrow mode round the right of the body. Differences between the two are the finer tooling and relief of the taller and erect figure of group A, while that of B seems more squat and has a more bowed posture; both make a distinctly classicising impression.  The haloed dividing figure is youthful and stands frontally, his flexed left leg and his right foot recalling the Buddha's stance; his hands are brought together before his breast and he wears a paridhana and uttariya with two long ends falling on each side; the uttariya crosses the body in the narrow mode from the left shoulder where it also forms a horizontal semiloop. Both arms wear an armlet and bracelets. The hair is in a chignon drawn in at its base; below it falls from a parting to form pronounced 'bouffant' locks at the sides, especially on the figure behind the Indra of group B, whose expression is much more of a beatific smile. Like that of Bu

    Detail: Other

  • Cylindrical casket, tapering slightly towards the rim and lacking a lid. The arcading round the side consists of eight pointed 'caitya' arches resting on pilasters. Each arch has a plain recessed face and the pilaster capitals consist of a plain fillet above a torus and a fillet. The pilaster shafts have each a recessed oblong panel with an outlined border curved at the top and the base mouldings repeat those of the capitals in a contrary sequence. The compartments form two groups (A and B) of three at opposite sides to each other, each group having an almost identical central Buddha flanked by closely similar, worshipping deities in profile, and the three are separated at both ends by a single similar compartment containing the same frontal worshipping figure.  The Buddha stands frontally in slight 'dehanchement', but his left leg is flexed and its foot raised, while his right leg points sideways as if he is walking. His right hand is raised, palm outwards, to the centre of his breast in a less usual, perhaps archaic abhayamudra, while the left hand rests somewhat indistinguishably at the hip, not very clearly holding the robe which seems also to be wrapped round the wrist and falling from it; a length of the robe also appears to hang from the right arm. The neckline on Buddha A is coherently in relief, while on Buddha B it is more diffused and linear; Buddha A is generally more finely executed, a thinner and taller figure with a long oval face and a more pronounced peak of the undulating hair where the face of the other is rounder, more youthful and with a less clear moustache. On both the robe hangs with some effect of wet drapery. Both Buddhas are haloed, but on Buddha A the halo has a raised border and the u??i?a is much larger and, with the open eyes and moustache, recalls an early Buddha type in stone.  On each Buddha's left stands a haloed turbaned figure of Indra in profile, his head somewhat inclined, the left leg flexed a little backwards, the left arm, with a bracelet and armlet, raised and hand(s) joined. He wears a paridhana, and unusually the uttariya hangs front and back over his right shoulder and loops round the left waist; on figure A a short length also hangs over the left shoulder. Other differences are in the position and relief of the lower left leg and in the more abundant drapery of the uttariya on figure B.  On each Buddha's right a haloed and bearded figure of Brahma, with a large chignon and a water pot held in his left hand, walks towards the Buddha and raises his right hand no higher than the Buddha's; it is seen from the back with the fingers curved forwards. He wears a paridhana, and the uttariya over his left shoulder, with a long fluttering fall at his back, appears on the left arm and loops in the narrow mode round the right of the body. Differences between the two are the finer tooling and relief of the taller and erect figure of group A, while that of B seems more squat and has a more bowed posture; both make a distinctly classicising impression.  The haloed dividing figure is youthful and stands frontally, his flexed left leg and his right foot recalling the Buddha's stance; his hands are brought together before his breast and he wears a paridhana and uttariya with two long ends falling on each side; the uttariya crosses the body in the narrow mode from the left shoulder where it also forms a horizontal semiloop. Both arms wear an armlet and bracelets. The hair is in a chignon drawn in at its base; below it falls from a parting to form pronounced 'bouffant' locks at the sides, especially on the figure behind the Indra of group B, whose expression is much more of a beatific smile. Like that of Bu

    Detail: Other

  • Cylindrical casket, tapering slightly towards the rim and lacking a lid. The arcading round the side consists of eight pointed 'caitya' arches resting on pilasters. Each arch has a plain recessed face and the pilaster capitals consist of a plain fillet above a torus and a fillet. The pilaster shafts have each a recessed oblong panel with an outlined border curved at the top and the base mouldings repeat those of the capitals in a contrary sequence. The compartments form two groups (A and B) of three at opposite sides to each other, each group having an almost identical central Buddha flanked by closely similar, worshipping deities in profile, and the three are separated at both ends by a single similar compartment containing the same frontal worshipping figure.  The Buddha stands frontally in slight 'dehanchement', but his left leg is flexed and its foot raised, while his right leg points sideways as if he is walking. His right hand is raised, palm outwards, to the centre of his breast in a less usual, perhaps archaic abhayamudra, while the left hand rests somewhat indistinguishably at the hip, not very clearly holding the robe which seems also to be wrapped round the wrist and falling from it; a length of the robe also appears to hang from the right arm. The neckline on Buddha A is coherently in relief, while on Buddha B it is more diffused and linear; Buddha A is generally more finely executed, a thinner and taller figure with a long oval face and a more pronounced peak of the undulating hair where the face of the other is rounder, more youthful and with a less clear moustache. On both the robe hangs with some effect of wet drapery. Both Buddhas are haloed, but on Buddha A the halo has a raised border and the u??i?a is much larger and, with the open eyes and moustache, recalls an early Buddha type in stone.  On each Buddha's left stands a haloed turbaned figure of Indra in profile, his head somewhat inclined, the left leg flexed a little backwards, the left arm, with a bracelet and armlet, raised and hand(s) joined. He wears a paridhana, and unusually the uttariya hangs front and back over his right shoulder and loops round the left waist; on figure A a short length also hangs over the left shoulder. Other differences are in the position and relief of the lower left leg and in the more abundant drapery of the uttariya on figure B.  On each Buddha's right a haloed and bearded figure of Brahma, with a large chignon and a water pot held in his left hand, walks towards the Buddha and raises his right hand no higher than the Buddha's; it is seen from the back with the fingers curved forwards. He wears a paridhana, and the uttariya over his left shoulder, with a long fluttering fall at his back, appears on the left arm and loops in the narrow mode round the right of the body. Differences between the two are the finer tooling and relief of the taller and erect figure of group A, while that of B seems more squat and has a more bowed posture; both make a distinctly classicising impression.  The haloed dividing figure is youthful and stands frontally, his flexed left leg and his right foot recalling the Buddha's stance; his hands are brought together before his breast and he wears a paridhana and uttariya with two long ends falling on each side; the uttariya crosses the body in the narrow mode from the left shoulder where it also forms a horizontal semiloop. Both arms wear an armlet and bracelets. The hair is in a chignon drawn in at its base; below it falls from a parting to form pronounced 'bouffant' locks at the sides, especially on the figure behind the Indra of group B, whose expression is much more of a beatific smile. Like that of Bu

    Detail: Other

  • Cylindrical casket, tapering slightly towards the rim and lacking a lid. The arcading round the side consists of eight pointed 'caitya' arches resting on pilasters. Each arch has a plain recessed face and the pilaster capitals consist of a plain fillet above a torus and a fillet. The pilaster shafts have each a recessed oblong panel with an outlined border curved at the top and the base mouldings repeat those of the capitals in a contrary sequence. The compartments form two groups (A and B) of three at opposite sides to each other, each group having an almost identical central Buddha flanked by closely similar, worshipping deities in profile, and the three are separated at both ends by a single similar compartment containing the same frontal worshipping figure.  The Buddha stands frontally in slight 'dehanchement', but his left leg is flexed and its foot raised, while his right leg points sideways as if he is walking. His right hand is raised, palm outwards, to the centre of his breast in a less usual, perhaps archaic abhayamudra, while the left hand rests somewhat indistinguishably at the hip, not very clearly holding the robe which seems also to be wrapped round the wrist and falling from it; a length of the robe also appears to hang from the right arm. The neckline on Buddha A is coherently in relief, while on Buddha B it is more diffused and linear; Buddha A is generally more finely executed, a thinner and taller figure with a long oval face and a more pronounced peak of the undulating hair where the face of the other is rounder, more youthful and with a less clear moustache. On both the robe hangs with some effect of wet drapery. Both Buddhas are haloed, but on Buddha A the halo has a raised border and the u??i?a is much larger and, with the open eyes and moustache, recalls an early Buddha type in stone.  On each Buddha's left stands a haloed turbaned figure of Indra in profile, his head somewhat inclined, the left leg flexed a little backwards, the left arm, with a bracelet and armlet, raised and hand(s) joined. He wears a paridhana, and unusually the uttariya hangs front and back over his right shoulder and loops round the left waist; on figure A a short length also hangs over the left shoulder. Other differences are in the position and relief of the lower left leg and in the more abundant drapery of the uttariya on figure B.  On each Buddha's right a haloed and bearded figure of Brahma, with a large chignon and a water pot held in his left hand, walks towards the Buddha and raises his right hand no higher than the Buddha's; it is seen from the back with the fingers curved forwards. He wears a paridhana, and the uttariya over his left shoulder, with a long fluttering fall at his back, appears on the left arm and loops in the narrow mode round the right of the body. Differences between the two are the finer tooling and relief of the taller and erect figure of group A, while that of B seems more squat and has a more bowed posture; both make a distinctly classicising impression.  The haloed dividing figure is youthful and stands frontally, his flexed left leg and his right foot recalling the Buddha's stance; his hands are brought together before his breast and he wears a paridhana and uttariya with two long ends falling on each side; the uttariya crosses the body in the narrow mode from the left shoulder where it also forms a horizontal semiloop. Both arms wear an armlet and bracelets. The hair is in a chignon drawn in at its base; below it falls from a parting to form pronounced 'bouffant' locks at the sides, especially on the figure behind the Indra of group B, whose expression is much more of a beatific smile. Like that of Bu

    Detail: Other

  • Cylindrical casket, tapering slightly towards the rim and lacking a lid. The arcading round the side consists of eight pointed 'caitya' arches resting on pilasters. Each arch has a plain recessed face and the pilaster capitals consist of a plain fillet above a torus and a fillet. The pilaster shafts have each a recessed oblong panel with an outlined border curved at the top and the base mouldings repeat those of the capitals in a contrary sequence. The compartments form two groups (A and B) of three at opposite sides to each other, each group having an almost identical central Buddha flanked by closely similar, worshipping deities in profile, and the three are separated at both ends by a single similar compartment containing the same frontal worshipping figure.  The Buddha stands frontally in slight 'dehanchement', but his left leg is flexed and its foot raised, while his right leg points sideways as if he is walking. His right hand is raised, palm outwards, to the centre of his breast in a less usual, perhaps archaic abhayamudra, while the left hand rests somewhat indistinguishably at the hip, not very clearly holding the robe which seems also to be wrapped round the wrist and falling from it; a length of the robe also appears to hang from the right arm. The neckline on Buddha A is coherently in relief, while on Buddha B it is more diffused and linear; Buddha A is generally more finely executed, a thinner and taller figure with a long oval face and a more pronounced peak of the undulating hair where the face of the other is rounder, more youthful and with a less clear moustache. On both the robe hangs with some effect of wet drapery. Both Buddhas are haloed, but on Buddha A the halo has a raised border and the u??i?a is much larger and, with the open eyes and moustache, recalls an early Buddha type in stone.  On each Buddha's left stands a haloed turbaned figure of Indra in profile, his head somewhat inclined, the left leg flexed a little backwards, the left arm, with a bracelet and armlet, raised and hand(s) joined. He wears a paridhana, and unusually the uttariya hangs front and back over his right shoulder and loops round the left waist; on figure A a short length also hangs over the left shoulder. Other differences are in the position and relief of the lower left leg and in the more abundant drapery of the uttariya on figure B.  On each Buddha's right a haloed and bearded figure of Brahma, with a large chignon and a water pot held in his left hand, walks towards the Buddha and raises his right hand no higher than the Buddha's; it is seen from the back with the fingers curved forwards. He wears a paridhana, and the uttariya over his left shoulder, with a long fluttering fall at his back, appears on the left arm and loops in the narrow mode round the right of the body. Differences between the two are the finer tooling and relief of the taller and erect figure of group A, while that of B seems more squat and has a more bowed posture; both make a distinctly classicising impression.  The haloed dividing figure is youthful and stands frontally, his flexed left leg and his right foot recalling the Buddha's stance; his hands are brought together before his breast and he wears a paridhana and uttariya with two long ends falling on each side; the uttariya crosses the body in the narrow mode from the left shoulder where it also forms a horizontal semiloop. Both arms wear an armlet and bracelets. The hair is in a chignon drawn in at its base; below it falls from a parting to form pronounced 'bouffant' locks at the sides, especially on the figure behind the Indra of group B, whose expression is much more of a beatific smile. Like that of Bu

    Full: Front