Marble relief (Block XLIV) from the South frieze of the Parthenon. The frieze shows the procession of the Panathenaic festival, the commemoration of the birthday of the goddess Athena.  The block shows a cow that is being led for sacrifice. Four youths are shown and the remains of two others on the extreme left and right, all wearing long cloaks. The youth on the left looks round to observe the commotion on the block behind him. At the same time he shortens the halter of the beast under his charge. A second youth reaches out to assist him and also looks back. Meanwhile the animal registers a protest by straining its neck upwards. The halter must have been added in paint. The flank of another beast is visible between the poorly preserved figure on the right and the youth looking back. This detail connects with the forepart of the animal that is carved on the next block, Block XLV. The head and dewlap of the beast on the next block, Block XLV, also connect well with the flank on this block. Further detail connecting Blocks XLIV and XLV is the line of the damaged arm of the youth on XLIV, which connects convincingly with the hand on XLV. (For argument see Jenkins, ‘The south frieze of the Parthenon: problems in arrangement’, American Journal of Archaeology, 99, p. 445-56). The broad, blank hides of the beasts contrast pleasingly with the complex folds of the drapery of the youths who lead them.   This scene in the frieze is thought to have inspired the poet John Keats in his ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’, to write of ‘the heifer lowing to the skies’.   For more information on the pedestrian-procession see South frieze Block XXXVI. The explosion of the Parthenon in 1687 damaged the South frieze the most.

Museum number

1816,0610.88

Description

Full: Front

Marble relief (Block XLIV) from the South frieze of the Parthenon. The frieze shows the procession of the Panathenaic festival, the commemoration of the birthday of the goddess Athena. The block shows a cow that is being led for sacrifice. Four youths are shown and the remains of two others on the extreme left and right, all wearing long cloaks. The youth on the left looks round to observe the commotion on the block behind him. At the same time he shortens the halter of the beast under his charge. A second youth reaches out to assist him and also looks back. Meanwhile the animal registers a protest by straining its neck upwards. The halter must have been added in paint. The flank of another beast is visible between the poorly preserved figure on the right and the youth looking back. This detail connects with the forepart of the animal that is carved on the next block, Block XLV. The head and dewlap of the beast on the next block, Block XLV, also connect well with the flank on this block. Further detail connecting Blocks XLIV and XLV is the line of the damaged arm of the youth on XLIV, which connects convincingly with the hand on XLV. (For argument see Jenkins, ‘The south frieze of the Parthenon: problems in arrangement’, American Journal of Archaeology, 99, p. 445-56). The broad, blank hides of the beasts contrast pleasingly with the complex folds of the drapery of the youths who lead them. This scene in the frieze is thought to have inspired the poet John Keats in his ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’, to write of ‘the heifer lowing to the skies’. For more information on the pedestrian-procession see South frieze Block XXXVI. The explosion of the Parthenon in 1687 damaged the South frieze the most.

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  • Marble relief (Block XLIV) from the South frieze of the Parthenon. The frieze shows the procession of the Panathenaic festival, the commemoration of the birthday of the goddess Athena.  The block shows a cow that is being led for sacrifice. Four youths are shown and the remains of two others on the extreme left and right, all wearing long cloaks. The youth on the left looks round to observe the commotion on the block behind him. At the same time he shortens the halter of the beast under his charge. A second youth reaches out to assist him and also looks back. Meanwhile the animal registers a protest by straining its neck upwards. The halter must have been added in paint. The flank of another beast is visible between the poorly preserved figure on the right and the youth looking back. This detail connects with the forepart of the animal that is carved on the next block, Block XLV. The head and dewlap of the beast on the next block, Block XLV, also connect well with the flank on this block. Further detail connecting Blocks XLIV and XLV is the line of the damaged arm of the youth on XLIV, which connects convincingly with the hand on XLV. (For argument see Jenkins, ‘The south frieze of the Parthenon: problems in arrangement’, American Journal of Archaeology, 99, p. 445-56). The broad, blank hides of the beasts contrast pleasingly with the complex folds of the drapery of the youths who lead them.   This scene in the frieze is thought to have inspired the poet John Keats in his ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’, to write of ‘the heifer lowing to the skies’.   For more information on the pedestrian-procession see South frieze Block XXXVI. The explosion of the Parthenon in 1687 damaged the South frieze the most.

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  • For book.

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  • Marble relief (Block XLV) from the South frieze of the Parthenon. The frieze shows the procession of the Panathenaic festival, the commemoration of the birthday of the goddess Athena.  The block shows five youths, wearing long cloaks, and two cows that are being led for sacrifice. The second youth from the left raises his hands to his hair to adjust a wreath, which probably was painted in. The lead animal sniffs at the ground, but does not bolt. Halters were added in paint. On the previous block, Block XLIV, the flank of beast is visible between the poorly preserved figure on the right and the youth looking back. This detail connects with the forepart of the animal that is carved on this block. The head and dewlap of the beast on this block also connect well with the flank on the previous block. Further detail connecting Blocks XLIV and XLV is the line of the damaged arm of the youth on XLIV, which connects convincingly with the hand on XLV. (For argument see Jenkins, ‘The south frieze of the Parthenon: problems in arrangement’, American Journal of Archaeology, 99, p. 445-56). The broad, blank hides of the beasts contrast pleasingly with the complex folds of the drapery of the youths who lead them.   For more information on the pedestrian-procession see South frieze Block XXXVI. The explosion of the Parthenon in 1687 damaged the South frieze the most.

    Full: Front

  • Marble relief, Slab XLII from the South Frieze of the Parthenon: four youths and a cow.

    Full: Front

  • Marble relief (Block XLV) from the South frieze of the Parthenon. The frieze shows the procession of the Panathenaic festival, the commemoration of the birthday of the goddess Athena.  The block shows five youths, wearing long cloaks, and two cows that are being led for sacrifice. The second youth from the left raises his hands to his hair to adjust a wreath, which probably was painted in. The lead animal sniffs at the ground, but does not bolt. Halters were added in paint. On the previous block, Block XLIV, the flank of beast is visible between the poorly preserved figure on the right and the youth looking back. This detail connects with the forepart of the animal that is carved on this block. The head and dewlap of the beast on this block also connect well with the flank on the previous block. Further detail connecting Blocks XLIV and XLV is the line of the damaged arm of the youth on XLIV, which connects convincingly with the hand on XLV. (For argument see Jenkins, ‘The south frieze of the Parthenon: problems in arrangement’, American Journal of Archaeology, 99, p. 445-56). The broad, blank hides of the beasts contrast pleasingly with the complex folds of the drapery of the youths who lead them.   For more information on the pedestrian-procession see South frieze Block XXXVI. The explosion of the Parthenon in 1687 damaged the South frieze the most.

    Full: Front

  • Marble relief (Block XLV) from the South frieze of the Parthenon. The frieze shows the procession of the Panathenaic festival, the commemoration of the birthday of the goddess Athena.  The block shows five youths, wearing long cloaks, and two cows that are being led for sacrifice. The second youth from the left raises his hands to his hair to adjust a wreath, which probably was painted in. The lead animal sniffs at the ground, but does not bolt. Halters were added in paint. On the previous block, Block XLIV, the flank of beast is visible between the poorly preserved figure on the right and the youth looking back. This detail connects with the forepart of the animal that is carved on this block. The head and dewlap of the beast on this block also connect well with the flank on the previous block. Further detail connecting Blocks XLIV and XLV is the line of the damaged arm of the youth on XLIV, which connects convincingly with the hand on XLV. (For argument see Jenkins, ‘The south frieze of the Parthenon: problems in arrangement’, American Journal of Archaeology, 99, p. 445-56). The broad, blank hides of the beasts contrast pleasingly with the complex folds of the drapery of the youths who lead them.   For more information on the pedestrian-procession see South frieze Block XXXVI. The explosion of the Parthenon in 1687 damaged the South frieze the most.

    Full: Front

  • Block XLV, figures 137-140 of the south frieze of the Parthenon   Graphite

    Full: Front