Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

Museum number

1816,0610.93

Description

Full: Front

Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost. A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet. The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

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  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Full: Back

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Side : left

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D).  A naked man reclines towards the left, on a rock. He leans on his left arm in an easy attitude. The legs are bent, the left leg drawn back under the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests is thrown a mantle under which is strewn a skin, the claws of which are certainly those some of a feline animal. He looked out from the pediment towards the corner and the chariot of Helios. He is the only figure whose head has been preserved. The head is weathered. Both hands and feet are missing. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but also Herakles and Theseus have been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Shot specifically for Dyfri Williams. Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Shot specifically for Dyfri Williams. Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Shot specifically for Dyfri Williams. Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Shot specifically for Dyfri Williams. Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Shot specifically for Dyfri Williams. Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Shot specifically for Dyfri Williams. Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Shot specifically for Dyfri Williams. Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment K). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  A figure of a naked man reclines on a rock, leaning on his left arm in a relaxed attitude, facing towards the chariot of Helios in the left corner of the pediment. His legs are bent, the left one drawn back behind the right. Over the rock on which the figure rests, a mantle is thrown, under which an animal skin is visible, its claws suggesting that it was a feline. Figure D is the only pediment sculpture to survive with its head intact. Still visible at the rear are traces of two braids across the nape of the neck. Both hands and feet are now missing, although the left foot was still seen and drawn by Carrey in 1674. The right foot was made separately and attached by means of a metal pin. Above the left foot is a hole for a metal attachment, perhaps an anklet.  The statue has been identified as Dionysos, but Herakles and Theseus have also been suggested.

    Full: Underside

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment D). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.

    Full: Back