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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 
Silver rectangular mounts with gold foil decoration, two reconstructed and fragments of ten others, from necks of bottles 1939,1010.122-127; mounted on a modern circular perspex mount. 
     The decoration consists of two identical repoussé animals with heads placed at opposite ends of the rectangle, upside down in relation to each other, their bodies and front legs interlacing. Each has a raised circular eye in a circular sunken field, and one sharply pointed ear occupying the corner of the rectangle. The animals' necks are filled with beading with a grooved border; their bodies are thicker and filled with a double line of beading arranged in a chevron or herring-bone pattern between plain borders, with similarly-decorated pear-shaped rear hips. The oval-shaped front hips are filled with five oblique beads. Both animals have short rear legs, long front legs and four-toed feet; their rear feet are placed at each end of the rectangular panel, in front of the animals' faces; their front feet are placed on each long side.
     The animals are contained within a single beaded border which runs along all four sides of the rectangle, with plain margins pierced by three rivet holes on each short side.

Museum number

1939,1010.122-127.B1-12

Description

Group of Objects

Silver rectangular mounts with gold foil decoration, two reconstructed and fragments of ten others, from necks of bottles 1939,1010.122-127; mounted on a modern circular perspex mount. The decoration consists of two identical repoussé animals with heads placed at opposite ends of the rectangle, upside down in relation to each other, their bodies and front legs interlacing. Each has a raised circular eye in a circular sunken field, and one sharply pointed ear occupying the corner of the rectangle. The animals' necks are filled with beading with a grooved border; their bodies are thicker and filled with a double line of beading arranged in a chevron or herring-bone pattern between plain borders, with similarly-decorated pear-shaped rear hips. The oval-shaped front hips are filled with five oblique beads. Both animals have short rear legs, long front legs and four-toed feet; their rear feet are placed at each end of the rectangular panel, in front of the animals' faces; their front feet are placed on each long side. The animals are contained within a single beaded border which runs along all four sides of the rectangle, with plain margins pierced by three rivet holes on each short side.

© The Trustees of the British Museum

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