The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

Museum number

WB.67

Description

Full: Front

The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll. The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene. The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement: (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward. On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

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  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Full: Front

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Full: Back

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Side

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    3/4: Right

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Inscription

  • The Reliquary is made of gold, rubies, pearls, enamelled gold and saphires and is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is  placed vertically in the  centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The  Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire. Below is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic.    The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or the scene of the Second Coming: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the  display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure).   On the base is  The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. The gold fortress below is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form.   On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean, duc de Berry (“d'azure semé de fleurs-de-lis d'or à la bordure engrêleé de gueules”).   To the upper part of the fortress is fixed (with long pins that slot into gold tubular sockets attached to the interior of the fortress walls) the green-enamelled rocky mound, out of which protrude four gold rectangular coffins and an upturned coffin lid. From each of the coffins emerges a white-enamelled naked figure; there are two men and two women - the latter wearing a form of nightcap covering their hair.   In the middle section is The Heavenly scene of intercession: within a broad architectural type of frame,  is a deep gold recess, protected by a rock-crystal 'window' set within a narrow gold frame ornamented with applied gold oak leaves and twigs; the 'window' is held in position by six short gold pins on the narrow frame which pass snugly into six small holes in the moulding surrounding the recess. Two figures kneel: on the left the Virgin Mary, on the right the kneeling St John the Baptist raises both hands and gazes up at Christ, who is seated on a red- and black-enamelled gold rainbow that emerges on either side from a vivid blue-enamelled cloud with wavy white edges. The Saint's “raiment of camel's hair” (Matt.3:4) is rendered in tooled gold but is partly covered by a white- and red-enamelled robe, from which protrudes his bare left leg.  The feet of Christ rest on the world, a white-enamelled globe divided into three parts by a thin black (?)-enamelled line.On either side of Christ's head are two angels who together hold a Crown of Thorns over his head. The angel (on the right) holds the three Nails in his left hand, whilst the other angel holds the lance in his right hand. The twelve Apostles are half-length figures that rise out of a mass of golden oak leaves, branches and tendrils, clutching their distinctive emblems which, li

    Detail: Other

  • COMPASS Title: The Holy Thorn Reliquary of Jean, duc de Berry

    Unknown

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Full: Front

  • Reliquary gold, enamelled and set with jewels; glazed frame containing the relic (a thorn from the Crown of Thorns) set upright in a cabochon sapphire; above: Jesus Christ seated on rainbow with world beneath his feet; two angels hold spear and nails; bel

    Full: Front

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Front:Top

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

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  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Back:Middle

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Full: Front

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Full: Front

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • The Reliquary is designed to display a holy relic, a single Thorn from the Crown of Thorns, which is the raison d'etre of this joyau and is placed vertically in the very centre under a rock-crystal 'window'. The inconspicuous Holy Thorn is mounted on a large square cabochon sapphire which, because of its size and brilliant colour, attracts the eye to the Holy Thorn - an object of such slender form and dull colouring that it almost disappears from sight. Immediately below the cabochon sapphire and the gem-set frame of the rock-crystal 'window' is an inscribed scroll which proclaims the origin of the Holy Relic: "Ista est una spinea corone Domini nostri ihesu cristi" ("This is a Thorn from the Crown of Our Lord Jesus Christ"). The inscription is finely engraved in black letter script; the letters have been filled with black enamel, and the three horizontal lines (above, below and between the two lines of the inscription) are filled with white enamel on the undulating surface of the scroll.  The Holy Thorn is set at the centre of a three-dimensional representation of the Last Judgement scene - or, as some scholars have proposed, the scene of the Second Coming. Because the precise iconographic distinctions between these two scenes at this date (c. 1405-10) in French art cannot be determined, the question remains unresolved. Certainly, the principal elements of the Last Judgement scene are included in this joyau: the Resurrection of the Dead, the two kneeling figures of Mary and John interceding on behalf of the Resurrected, the emphatic display of the Five Wounds of Christ, the accompanying Instruments of the Passion (carried by the two angels on either side of the Christ in Judgement figure) - all these iconographic elements seem to establish the basic essentials of the Last Judgement scene.  The goldsmith has ambitiously attempted (with gold, enamel, pearls and gemstones) to convey the scene both on Earth and in Heaven on that Last Day of Judgement:  (a) The Resurrection of the Dead: depicted in an earthly setting comprising a gold castellated fortress with four square turrets, each occupied by a half-length angel sounding a gold trumpet; these four gold angels are enamelled in white, two of them having light blue-enamelled fleurs-de-lis added on top of the white and two of them having the light blue enamel decoration added in dots, to form a floral pattern. This is a very early - almost primitive -form of painted enamel technique. A further addition of coloured enamel occurs on the drapery at the front of the necks of three of the angels, but their hair has, in each case, been left tooled in the gold without any enamel. Similarly, the gold fortress is left in a plain but burnished state with arrow-slits and square-headed windows cut out of the gold surface, whilst some windows are given gold shutters pushed open from the bottom. The central portal is flanked by two square turrets, between which is the door, approached by a grand flight of five steps projecting in a three-sided form. The door is closed but rendered in meticulous detail with its two massive horizontal hinge clasps and a square lock; an examination of the reverse shows that the door was made separately and let into the gold walls which had been cut to this unusual scalloped flat-headed shape. Above the door a small triangular turret projects forward.  On either side of the grand portal the walls of the fortress spread out diagonally back to a second pair of square corner turrets; these two side walls (each carried on a broad round-headed arch) are set with two long rectangular panels, each engraved and decorated in blue and red translucent enamel with the arms of Jean,

    Detail: Other

  • Reliquary of gold, richly enamelled and set with rubies, pearls and sapphires. Architectural base in form of castellated fortress with a half-length angel sounding a trumpet occupying each turret, base also with arms of Jean, duc de Berry in rectangular panels of blue and red translucent enamel. The front is a depiction of the Resurrection of the Dead, a green-enamelled mound rising from the base from which coffins protrude, the dead rising from within. Above is a rock-crystal window, the Thorn placed vertically in the centre, mounted on a cabochon sapphire, above an inscribed scroll. Figures of the Virgin and St. John kneel beside the Thorn, Christ with his five wounds is seated behind it, his feet resting on a white-enamelled globe. Two angels hold a crown of thorns above his head, the instruments of the Passion in their other hands. An arch is formed around the whole by the twelve Apostles within a mass of leaves and branches, God the Father at the top. On the reverse are two hinged… (See Merlin record for full description)

    Full: Front

  • Reliquary of gold, richly enamelled and set with rubies, pearls and sapphires. Architectural base in form of castellated fortress with a half-length angel sounding a trumpet occupying each turret, base also with arms of Jean, duc de Berry in rectangular panels of blue and red translucent enamel. The front is a depiction of the Resurrection of the Dead, a green-enamelled mound rising from the base from which coffins protrude, the dead rising from within. Above is a rock-crystal window, the Thorn placed vertically in the centre, mounted on a cabochon sapphire, above an inscribed scroll. Figures of the Virgin and St. John kneel beside the Thorn, Christ with his five wounds is seated behind it, his feet resting on a white-enamelled globe. Two angels hold a crown of thorns above his head, the instruments of the Passion in their other hands. An arch is formed around the whole by the twelve Apostles within a mass of leaves and branches, God the Father at the top. On the reverse are two hinged… (See Merlin record for full description)

    Full: Front