Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment A).  The neck of a male figure has a forward inclination corresponding with the action of the arms, which are stretched out in front of the body and used to hold the reins of the horses in front. Head, hand and wrist of the right arm, and hand, wrist and forearm of the left arm are missing. The rest of the body should is to be imagined as still under water.  The sculpture has been identified as Helios, the sun-god. Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. His chariot is emerging from the waves. In the very corners of this triangle, the time of day was set by the chariot of Helios, rising at dawn, and the chariot of Selene, sinking beneath the horizon. The waves are treated in the conventional manner usual in representations of water in Greek art. The metal reins have been attached to the upper surface of the plinth under the right forearm, and also under the right forearm, now lost.

Museum number

1816,0610.92

Description

Detail: Other

Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment A). The neck of a male figure has a forward inclination corresponding with the action of the arms, which are stretched out in front of the body and used to hold the reins of the horses in front. Head, hand and wrist of the right arm, and hand, wrist and forearm of the left arm are missing. The rest of the body should is to be imagined as still under water. The sculpture has been identified as Helios, the sun-god. Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. His chariot is emerging from the waves. In the very corners of this triangle, the time of day was set by the chariot of Helios, rising at dawn, and the chariot of Selene, sinking beneath the horizon. The waves are treated in the conventional manner usual in representations of water in Greek art. The metal reins have been attached to the upper surface of the plinth under the right forearm, and also under the right forearm, now lost.

© The Trustees of the British Museum

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  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment A).  The neck of a male figure has a forward inclination corresponding with the action of the arms, which are stretched out in front of the body and used to hold the reins of the horses in front. Head, hand and wrist of the right arm, and hand, wrist and forearm of the left arm are missing. The rest of the body should is to be imagined as still under water.  The sculpture has been identified as Helios, the sun-god. Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. His chariot is emerging from the waves. In the very corners of this triangle, the time of day was set by the chariot of Helios, rising at dawn, and the chariot of Selene, sinking beneath the horizon. The waves are treated in the conventional manner usual in representations of water in Greek art. The metal reins have been attached to the upper surface of the plinth under the right forearm, and also under the right forearm, now lost.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment A).  The neck of a male figure has a forward inclination corresponding with the action of the arms, which are stretched out in front of the body and used to hold the reins of the horses in front. Head, hand and wrist of the right arm, and hand, wrist and forearm of the left arm are missing. The rest of the body should is to be imagined as still under water.  The sculpture has been identified as Helios, the sun-god. Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. His chariot is emerging from the waves. In the very corners of this triangle, the time of day was set by the chariot of Helios, rising at dawn, and the chariot of Selene, sinking beneath the horizon. The waves are treated in the conventional manner usual in representations of water in Greek art. The metal reins have been attached to the upper surface of the plinth under the right forearm, and also under the right forearm, now lost.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment A).  The neck of a male figure has a forward inclination corresponding with the action of the arms, which are stretched out in front of the body and used to hold the reins of the horses in front. Head, hand and wrist of the right arm, and hand, wrist and forearm of the left arm are missing. The rest of the body should is to be imagined as still under water.  The sculpture has been identified as Helios, the sun-god. Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. His chariot is emerging from the waves. In the very corners of this triangle, the time of day was set by the chariot of Helios, rising at dawn, and the chariot of Selene, sinking beneath the horizon. The waves are treated in the conventional manner usual in representations of water in Greek art. The metal reins have been attached to the upper surface of the plinth under the right forearm, and also under the right forearm, now lost.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment A).  The neck of a male figure has a forward inclination corresponding with the action of the arms, which are stretched out in front of the body and used to hold the reins of the horses in front. Head, hand and wrist of the right arm, and hand, wrist and forearm of the left arm are missing. The rest of the body should is to be imagined as still under water.  The sculpture has been identified as Helios, the sun-god. Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. His chariot is emerging from the waves. In the very corners of this triangle, the time of day was set by the chariot of Helios, rising at dawn, and the chariot of Selene, sinking beneath the horizon. The waves are treated in the conventional manner usual in representations of water in Greek art. The metal reins have been attached to the upper surface of the plinth under the right forearm, and also under the right forearm, now lost.

    Detail: Other

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment B and C).  Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. They are represented emerging from the waves. The inner pair op horses is in the Acropolis Museum, Athens. The horses are made out of one piece of marble. The head of the nearest horse misses the lower jaw, but its action is most spirited. The other horse's head is damaged badly. Metal reins attached the horses onto Helios. The places where the reins were attached are visible by drilling holes.

    Side : left

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment B and C).  Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. They are represented emerging from the waves. The inner pair op horses is in the Acropolis Museum, Athens. The horses are made out of one piece of marble. The head of the nearest horse misses the lower jaw, but its action is most spirited. The other horse's head is damaged badly. Metal reins attached the horses onto Helios. The places where the reins were attached are visible by drilling holes.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment B and C).  Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. They are represented emerging from the waves. The inner pair op horses is in the Acropolis Museum, Athens. The horses are made out of one piece of marble. The head of the nearest horse misses the lower jaw, but its action is most spirited. The other horse's head is damaged badly. Metal reins attached the horses onto Helios. The places where the reins were attached are visible by drilling holes.

    Front:Top

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment B and C).  Helios' chariot was drawn by two pairs of horses. They are represented emerging from the waves. The inner pair op horses is in the Acropolis Museum, Athens. The horses are made out of one piece of marble. The head of the nearest horse misses the lower jaw, but its action is most spirited. The other horse's head is damaged badly. Metal reins attached the horses onto Helios. The places where the reins were attached are visible by drilling holes.

    Front:Top

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment B). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  This group survives as the heads and necks of two horses on a plinth. They are made from a single piece of marble and formed the outer pair of originally two pairs of horses from the chariot of the male figure East pediment A (Helios). The lower jaw of the nearest horse is missing; the corners of its mouth are worked for the insertion of metal reins (now lost). The other horse's head is almost entirely gone. The plinth is worked with three drill holes for the insertion of the horses’ reins; a small portion at the front is hollowed out to accommodate the foot of the figure East Pediment D. The inner pair of horses (East pediment C) is in the Acropolis Museum, Athens.  The horses are the chariot horses of Helios, the sun-god, rising from the sea at dawn. Helios in his chariot was positioned in the very left-hand corner of the pediment, and was complemented by the chariot of Selene, the moon-goddess, sinking beneath the horizon, in the right-hand corner of the pediment.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment K). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.

    Full: Front

  • Marble statue from the East pediment of the Parthenon (East pediment A). The East pediment showed the miraculous birth of the goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus. Many of the figures from the central scene are now fragmentary or entirely lost.  East pediment A survives as a part of the upper body of a male figure on a plinth, made from a single piece of marble. The sculpture represents a charioteer, part of a group with four horses. The charioteer is carved as if rising out of the sea. Waves are carved across the cheat. The remains of the neck show that the head was tilted upwards, parallel to the arms, which also rise out of water. The hands originally held the reins of the four-horses (East pediment B and C). Most of the head, right hand and wrist, and left hand, wrist and forearm are missing, though a left hand in the Acropolis Museum, Athens, may belong to this figure. On the top waves are carved in shallow relief, so that the figure appears as if he and his chariot are emerging from water. The metal reins, now lost, would have been attached to the upper surface of the plinth under the right forearm where a dowel hole remains.  The sculpture has been identified as Helios, the sun-god, rising from the sea at dawn. It was positioned in the very left-hand corner of the pediment, and was complemented by the chariot of Selene, the moon-goddess, or Nyx, goddess of the night, sinking beneath the horizon, in the right-hand corner of the pediment.

    Detail: Other