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medal

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    G3,FD.151

  • Description

    Silver medal.(obverse) A hand from heaven holding a cord, which connects the shields of England and France, both crowned, and a heart with the arrows of the United Provinces.
    (reverse) Fleet in distress; above, in radiated clouds, the name of Jehovah in Hebrew.

  • Date

    • 1596
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Dimensions

    • Diameter: 51 millimetres
    • Weight: 45.75 grammes
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Position

        reverse
      • Inscription Content

        QVID . ME . PERSEQVERIS. 1596.
      • Inscription Translation

        Why persecutest thou me ?
      • Inscription Comment

        Acts, ix. 4.
        Stops, crosses saltire.
      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Position

        obverse
      • Inscription Content

        RVMPITVR . HAVD . FACILE.
      • Inscription Translation

        It is not easily broken.
      • Inscription Comment

        Stops, crosses saltire.
  • Curator's comments

    Medallic Illustrations 1
    Not rare.
    In 1596, Elizabeth despatched a fleet to Cadiz and destroyed an immense armament prepared for the invasion of England by Philip II, who sustained damage to the amount of about 20,000,000 ducats. He rapidly formed another armament which sailed from Ferrol, but was overtaken with a violent storm off Cape Finisterre, when 40 vessels were wrecked and 5,000 seamen drowned. These repeated failures were attributed to the direct interposition of Providence, who is here made to address Philip in the words addressed to Saul. The obverse of this medal alludes to the confederacy between England, France and the Netherlands, which was still in force when the Spanish fleet was destroyed, but which was easily broken by Henry IV. (See Medallic Illustrations 1, p. 173, No. 170.)

    See Pinkerton, J., ‘The Medallic History of England to the Revolution’, London, 1790 (fol.), ix. 3; Van Loon, Gerard, ‘Histoire Métallique des XVII. Provinces des Pays-Bas’, 5 vol. La Haye, 1732-1837 (fol) [There is also an edition in Dutch, but with different paging], I. 476; Luckius, Johannes Jacobus, ‘Sylloge Numismatum elegantiorum, &c.’, Argentinae, 1620 (fol), 357; Evelyn, John, ‘A Discourse of Medals ancient and modern, &c’, London, 1697 (fol.), 99.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Medallic Illustrations 1 p163.148 bibliographic details
  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Associated places

  • Associated events

    • Commemoration of: Defeat of Philip II of Spain by the allies
  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1825

  • Department

    Coins & Medals

  • Registration number

    G3,FD.151

  • Additional IDs

    • 476
  • C&M Catalogue number

    • MB1p163.148

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Object reference number: CME942

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