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drinking-horn

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1939,1010.120

  • Description

    Silver-gilt drinking-horn fittings mounted onto a replica horn; one of a pair, with 1939,1010.121.
    At the mouth of the horn is a rim-mount consisting of four rectangular silver-gilt foil panels, decorated with a zoomorphic design comprising six interlacing animals with.upper and lower borders of a chevron-like design. The panels are fastened to the horn with silver-gilt clips, or pilasters, decorated with double human masks arranged one above the other. Above the uppermost mask is a broad fluted clip. The pilasters are placed between the rectangular panels.
    Abutting the rectangular rim mounts are twelve triangular foil vandykes. The join between these two groups of fittings is concealed beneath a fluted strip. The vandykes are decorated with a zoomorphic design comprising four pairs of interlacing animals within a narrow beaded border.
    At the tip of the horn is a cast bird's head terminal with curved beak. Above this are three raised rings or collars of silver-gilt, decorated with interlace and beading. Between these are two decorative panels. Six triangular vandykes splay out from the uppermost raised ring or collar, pointing towards the mouth of the horn. These vandykes are decorated with a zoomorphic design comprising two pendant beast heads above four interlacing pairs of animals.

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  • School/style

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • early 7thC
  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Diameter: 9.5 centimetres (rim)
    • Length: 61 centimetres (reconstructed)
  • Curator's comments

    Pair with 1939,1010.121

  • Bibliography

    • Bruce-Mitford 1983 Fig. 233 bibliographic details
    • Speake 1980 Pl. 14n bibliographic details
  • Location

    G2/fc165

  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    1980 10 Mar-30 Sep, Sweden, Stockholm, Statens Historika Museum, The Vikings are Here

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1939

  • Acquisition notes

    Excavated 1939

  • Department

    Britain, Europe and Prehistory

  • Registration number

    1939,1010.120

Silver-gilt drinking-horn mounts on replica horn. Rim-mount consisting of four rectangular silver-gilt foil panels of animal interlace, fastened by clips with double human masks.  Twelve triangular vandykes with interlace design abutt rim. At tip is cast bird's head terminal, above this three bands of interlace and beading, with decorative panels in between.  Six triangular vandykes splay out from uppermost interlace band, pointing towards mouth of horn.

Silver-gilt drinking-horn mounts on replica horn. Rim-mount consisting of four rectangular silver-gilt foil panels of animal interlace, fastened by clips with double human masks. Twelve triangular vandykes with interlace design abutt rim. At tip is cast bird's head terminal, above this three bands of interlace and beading, with decorative panels in between. Six triangular vandykes splay out from uppermost interlace band, pointing towards mouth of horn.

Image description

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Object reference number: MCS8522

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