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bottle

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1939,1010.122-127.A1-59

  • Description

    Nine silver triangular vandykes from bottles 1939,1010.122-127, in fifty-nine fragments, including some gold foil overlays; mounted on a modern perspex backing.
    Each vandyke is decorated with repoussé Style II decoration, comprising two facing animals with D-shaped eyes, their heads meeting at the broad end of the triangle. Their ribbon bodies are filled with transverse beading between plain raised borders; their bodies taoer towards the point of the triangle, and terminate in a long 'feathered' inward-facing foot. The animals have front hips and long thin legs which interlace symmetrically, pass through the animals' jaws and end in a three-toed foot in the upper corners of the triangle. At the pointed base of each triangle is a frontal human mask with circular eyes, moustache and beard formed by three beads; three triangles arranged over the head resemble hair. The entire design is contained within a beaded border which runs around all three sides of the vandyke, with a plain margin pierced with nine rivet holes, four down each long side and one at the tip of the triangle.

    More 

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • early 7thC
  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 6.3 centimetres
    • Width: 2.3 centimetres (max)
  • Bibliography

    • Speake 1980 Fig. 15b bibliographic details
    • Bruce-Mitford 1983 Figs. 261b, 263 bibliographic details
  • Location

    G2/fc165

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    2 November 2005

    Treatment proposal

    Clean, consolidate, repair and re-pack as necessary.

    Condition

    Some of the fragments include gold foils. They are all adhered onto perspex mounts. Very fragile and dirty fragments.

    Treatment details

    The dust was removed by a puffer. The gold foils and some silver fragments were consolidated by using 5% Paraloid B72 (ethyl methacrylate copolymer) in Acetone (propan-1-one/dimethyl ketone) and Industrial methylated spirits (ethanol,methanol) 50:50. The loose fragments were put in a gelatin capsules. A correx box was made with plastazote cut outs.

    About these records 

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1939

  • Acquisition notes

    Excavated 1939

  • Department

    Britain, Europe and Prehistory

  • Registration number

    1939,1010.122-127.A1-59

Silver rectangular mounts with gold foil decoration, two reconstructed and fragments of ten others, from necks of bottles 1939,1010.122-127; mounted on a modern circular perspex mount. 
     The decoration consists of two identical repoussé animals with heads placed at opposite ends of the rectangle, upside down in relation to each other, their bodies and front legs interlacing. Each has a raised circular eye in a circular sunken field, and one sharply pointed ear occupying the corner of the rectangle. The animals' necks are filled with beading with a grooved border; their bodies are thicker and filled with a double line of beading arranged in a chevron or herring-bone pattern between plain borders, with similarly-decorated pear-shaped rear hips. The oval-shaped front hips are filled with five oblique beads. Both animals have short rear legs, long front legs and four-toed feet; their rear feet are placed at each end of the rectangular panel, in front of the animals' faces; their front feet are placed on each long side.
     The animals are contained within a single beaded border which runs along all four sides of the rectangle, with plain margins pierced by three rivet holes on each short side.

Group of Objects

Silver rectangular mounts with gold foil decoration, two reconstructed and fragments of ten others, from necks of bottles 1939,1010.122-127; mounted on a modern circular perspex mount. The decoration consists of two identical repoussé animals with heads placed at opposite ends of the rectangle, upside down in relation to each other, their bodies and front legs interlacing. Each has a raised circular eye in a circular sunken field, and one sharply pointed ear occupying the corner of the rectangle. The animals' necks are filled with beading with a grooved border; their bodies are thicker and filled with a double line of beading arranged in a chevron or herring-bone pattern between plain borders, with similarly-decorated pear-shaped rear hips. The oval-shaped front hips are filled with five oblique beads. Both animals have short rear legs, long front legs and four-toed feet; their rear feet are placed at each end of the rectangular panel, in front of the animals' faces; their front feet are placed on each long side. The animals are contained within a single beaded border which runs along all four sides of the rectangle, with plain margins pierced by three rivet holes on each short side.

Image description

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Object reference number: MCS17030

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