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drawing

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1946,0713.822

  • Description

    Three women in a garden, one taking fruits from a basket offered by another; a large vase on a balustrade at l, a statue of Pan and a house beyond at r Pen and brown ink, with brown and blue-grey wash, over black and red chalk, squared for transfer

  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 1643-1679
  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 200 millimetres
    • Width: 293 millimetres
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Content

        Inscribed: "P. Cortona" Verso inscribed: "Pietro da Cortona"

        Turner 1999
        Inscribed in brown ink in the lower right corner: "P. Cartone".
  • Curator's comments

    The drawing bears an old attribution to Pietro da Cortona, and was catalogued as such by Popham in 1935. It was placed among the Roman anonymous drawings when the Phillipps-Fenwick drawings were given to the Museum in 1946. Dieter Graf in 1975 attributed it to Cortese, an attribution retained by Turner in the 1999 catalogue. Sutherland Harris suggested instead that it is by the French artist Thomas Blanchet (1614-1689). Lit.: A.E. Popham, 'Catalogue of Drawings in the Collection formed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart., F.R.S., now in the possession of his Grandson, T. Fitzroy Phillipps Fenwick of Thirlestaine House, Cheltenham', London, 1935, p. 137, no. 2 (as Pietro da Cortona); N. Turner, 'Italian Drawings in the BM, Roman Baroque Drawings', London, 1999, I, no. 61; A. Sutherland Harris, review of Turner 'Roman Baroque Drawings', "Master Drawings", 39, 4, 2001, p. 61 (as Thomas Blanchet)

    Turner 1999
    When in the Fenwick collection, the drawing was attributed by Popham to Pietro da Cortona; but it was placed as anonymous seventeenth-century Italian School on entering the Department of Prints and Drawings and kept in the unmounted series. Graf, in 1975, was the first to attribute the drawing to Guglielmo Cortese. Its purpose remains unknown, though it may have been made as a design for a print, perhaps for a thesis illustration. The blue wash in the sky may be a later addition.
    The three women are tending the garden of a villa or palace, with one of the women taking flowers or fruit from the flat basket held by her kneeling companion and apparently placing them in the large urn on the balustrade in the foreground. The vogue for gardening in Rome in the middle of the seventeenth century was partly a result of Giovanni Battista Ferrari's then fashionable book on horticulture, 'De florum cultura', first published in Rome in 1633, for which 1946,0713.803 is a design for one of the engraved illustrations.

    Literature: Popham, 1935, I, p.137, no. 2 (as Pietro da Cortona)

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Turner 1999 61 bibliographic details
    • Phillipps-Fenwick 1935 p.137(2) bibliographic details
  • Location

    Not on display (Italian Roy XVIIc)

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1946

  • Department

    Prints & Drawings

  • Registration number

    1946,0713.822

Three women in a garden, one taking fruits from a basket offered by another; a large vase on a balustrade at l, a statue of Pan and a house beyond at r Pen and brown ink, with brown and blue-grey wash, over black and red chalk, squared for transfer

Recto

Three women in a garden, one taking fruits from a basket offered by another; a large vase on a balustrade at l, a statue of Pan and a house beyond at r Pen and brown ink, with brown and blue-grey wash, over black and red chalk, squared for transfer

Image description

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