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drawing

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1880,0214.25

  • Description

    Dancers at a village wedding with the bride seated at a table beyond, a stream in the landscape to left; after Pieter Brueghel the Elder Pen and brown ink with brown wash, over black chalk, indented for transfer

  • Producer name

  • School/style

  • Date

    • 1597 (c.)
  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 241 millimetres
    • Width: 379 millimetres
  • Curator's comments

    Ertz describes this sheet as a preparatory study for the small panel painting showing a peasant wedding feast, tentatively attributed to Jan Brueghel the Elder and dated around 1597 (kept in a private collection in England).
    This drawing, as pointed out by Bastelaer, is a compilation of several earlier prints and drawings. The dancing figures in the foreground are derived from the engraving 'The Peasant Wedding Dance' by Pieter van der Heyden after Pieter Bruegel the Elder (New Hollstein 44; wanting in BM). The watermill in the central background and the buildings at right are copied from the drawing showing the Bee-Keepers at the Kupferstichkabinett in Berlin (for a copy in the British Museum, see SL,5236.59). Although Bastelaer describes the figures in conversation in the left foreground as copied from a drawing at the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest, inv.no.1455 (another copied version is in the Kupferstichkabinett, Berlin, inv.no.13216), their weak drawing style suggests they were both copied from the Hollar etching (see below).

    This drawing is engraved in reproduction by Hollar in 1650 (New Hollstein 1087), see 1867,1012.576; it is likely the indentations on the sheet were made by Hollar. Hendrik Hondius (New Hollstein 29) earlier copied the figures in the foreground in another print dated 1644, see 1871,1209.1037.

    Literature: R. van Bastelaer, 'Les estampes de Peter Bruegel l'ancien', Brussels, 1908, p.84; A.E. Popham, 'Catalogue of Drawings by Dutch and Flemish Artists preserved in the Department of Prints and Drawings in the British Museum, Vol.V: Dutch and Flemish Drawings of the XV and XVI Centuries', London, 1932, pp.146-147; T. Gerszi, 'Netherlandish Drawings in the Budapest Museum. Sixteenth Century Drawings', 1971, cat.no.35; M. Winner, in 'Pieter Breughel d. Ä. als Zeichner', exh.cat. Kupferstichkabinett Berlin, 1975, cat.no.101 (as Jan Brueghel); K. Ertz, "Jan Brueghel der Ältere: Die Gemälde", Cologne, 1979, under cat.no.39, p.564 (for the painting see fig.558).

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  • Bibliography

    • Popham (D+F) 12 (as 'Copies from Pieter Bruegel I') bibliographic details
  • Location

    Flemish Roy XVIIc

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1880

  • Department

    Prints & Drawings

  • Registration number

    1880,0214.25

Dancers at a village wedding, after Pieter Brueghel the elder; with the bride seated at a table beyond, a stream in the landscape to l
Pen and brown ink, with brown wash, over black chalk, indented for transfer

Recto

Dancers at a village wedding, after Pieter Brueghel the elder; with the bride seated at a table beyond, a stream in the landscape to l Pen and brown ink, with brown wash, over black chalk, indented for transfer

Image description

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Object reference number: PDO11856

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