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figure

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    EA11101

  • Description

    Solid-cast copper alloy figure of Osiris; eyes inlaid with copper and silver; incised collar; the feet are lost.

  • Culture/period

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 30.1 centimetres
    • Width: 8.4 centimetres
  • Location

    G1/wp83/4

  • Condition

    fair (incomplete)

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    12 May 2003

    Reason for treatment

    Permanent Exhibition

    Treatment proposal

    Remove chemical residues. Surface coating degraded -remove.

    Condition

    The object is badly chemically stripped. The lower part which must have been heavily minearlised has been lost. The brow ,eye inlays and beard strap have been overcleaned to bright metal and are heavily scratched.. All information relating to the original polychromy has been lost. The inlays have not been analysed but it is probable that the brows, the whole eye, and the beard strap which are separate inlays were originally black bronze patinated to a dark colouration. Into the corners of each eye silver sheet has been applied to represent the white of the eye.

    An old modern surface coating on the bronze is beginning to break down. There are plaster residues on the lower part of the figure from an old mounting fixing.

    There are blue chemical residues by the proper right wrist and behind the flail

    The proper left atef feather is damaged.

    Treatment details

    Nothing can be done to improve the appearance of the bronze except for removal of the chemical residues. This was done by manually removing the blue corrosion from the residues under magnification and rinsing the area with distilled water on cotton wool swabs,dried with acetone.

    Plaster residues on the lower part of the object were cleaned off manually wih a scalpel,acetone and a stencil brush.

    Object recorded for the polychrome bronze project.

    About these records 

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1875

  • Department

    Ancient Egypt & Sudan

  • BM/Big number

    EA11101

  • Registration number

    1875,0810.102

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Object reference number: YCA2232

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