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To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

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bag

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    Oc1928,0110.107

  • Description

    Bag made of vegetable fibre.

  • Ethnic name

  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Width: 33 centimetres
    • Height: 43 centimetres
    • Depth: 2 centimetres
  • Curator's comments

    "The largest bag of the stiffer grass is a 'dilly bag' & the native name of the plant is 'boombi'. The plant grows on the ridges round here & is not uncommon." From a letter sent to Prof A Liversidge by Mary Bundock, written at the Wyangarie Station in the Richmond River District, dated 8 October 1879. Contained in Ethdoc 921.Looped and knotted bags were made on the east coast of Australia from the Richmond River area north to Moreton Bay. Basket-makers worked with the colour of the rushes – deeper near the stem – to great effect. These baskets are no longer produced, and there is only one known photograph of people with this type of bag.British Museum Register, 1928, Observations column: 'Made by the last woman of the TARAMPA tribe, QUEENSLAND. See letter of Oct. 8. 1879 (and label I. England. Feby. 1873")'.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Bolton 2011 p.44 bibliographic details
  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:
    1972-1982 23 Jun-28 Feb, London, BM, Museum of Mankind, The Aborigines of Australia
    2011 26 May – 11 Sep, London, BM, "Baskets and Belonging: Indigenous Australian Histories"

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    15 April 2011

    Reason for treatment

    Temporary Exhibition

    Treatment proposal

    Light clean. Repair break in handle. Make padded insert.

    Condition

    Slightly dirty. Mishapen. Handle weak where damaged in one place near top.

    Treatment details

    Cleaned lightly with a vacuum cleaner whilst brsuhing lightly with a soft brush. Cleaned by gentle application of chemical / smoke sponge to surface. Gently reshaped by gradually raising humidity in cabinet to c. 90%RH whilst gradually padding with soft crumpled nylon net. Padded insert made from smooth undyed silk fabric lightly stuffed with layers of polyester wadding fabric. Handle mended where weak with twists of mulberry paper coloured with Liquitex acrylic colours diluted in water using spots of HMG Paraloid B72 (methyl ethyl methacrlylate) adheive to secure,

    About these records 

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1928

  • Department

    Africa, Oceania & the Americas

  • Registration number

    Oc1928,0110.107


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Object reference number: EOC16842

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