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barkcloth sample

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    Oc1953,11.1

  • Description

    Rectangular sheet of barkcloth decorated with designs in square panels, including a seated man in European dress. Various inscriptions, including "Ikieaulua Nuie oke 1887" (Ikiaulua = a high ranking person, oke = October), "Tamakautoca" (the name of a village) and "Tokeheloto" (Always remember).

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  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 152 centimetres
    • Width: 115 centimetres
  • Curator's comments

    Translations provided by John Pule. Added JEN 9/2001.See John Pule and Nicholas Thomas, 'Hiapo: Past and present in Niuean barkcloth', Dunedin, University of Otago Press, 2005, pp.118-119Register 1953
    Bark-cloth, rectangular sheet of : decorated in black with inscriptions including "Niue .... 1887".
    Niue.
    Given by G.A. Dickman Esq., County offices, Haverford West, Pembroke (1953). Formerly in the St. David's Museum.See Adrienne L. Kaeppler, Animal Designs on Samoan Siapo and Other Thoughts on west Polynesian Barkcloth design; The Journal of the Polynesian Society, Vol. 114, No.3, September 2005,, p.213

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  • Condition

    Poor. Rust damage. Fragile.

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    18 December 2002

    Treatment proposal

    Straighten folds. Clean as far as possible. Paper adhesive repairs on back where weak/holes. Double check no remaims of drawing pins.

    ? Roll for storage / keep flat - discuss with helen Wolfe

    Condition

    Fold marks from previous folding. Dirty. Previous use of drawing pins had led to some loss/staining/damage in these areas. Additional larger areas of staining on barkcloth.

    Some tears and holes.

    Treatment details

    After testing, to ensure colour fast, barkcloth straightened using Goretex (polytetrafluoro ethylene,polyester laminate) by placing cotton fabric lightly moistened with distilled water beneath and covering with polythene. Glass weights gradually appplied during treatment to gradually ease out creases.

    Japanese paper coloured to a variety of sympathetic colours using Rowney's Cryla colours (acrylic) diluted in water and left to dry. Oval shaped patches water-torn from paper and patches applied to reverse of barkcloth where weak or torn, or with areas missing by painting Arrowroot starch (starch) and alginate paste diluted with water onto Japanese paper before applying patches to reverse using finger pressure. A double layer of patches was applied where necessary for strength.

    About these records 

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1953

  • Acquisition notes

    Register 1953: Given by G.A. Dickman Esq., County offices, Haverford West, Pembroke (1953). Formerly in the St. David's Museum.

  • Department

    Africa, Oceania & the Americas

  • Registration number

    Oc1953,11.1

Rectangular sheet of barkcloth decorated with designs in square panels, including a seated man in European dress. Various inscriptions, including "Ikieaulua Nuie oke 1887" (Ikiaulua = a high ranking person, oke = October), "Tamakautoca" (the name of a village) and "Tokeheloto" (Always remember).

black surround

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Object reference number: EOC21810

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