What just happened?

To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Collection online

Additional options
Production date to

Or search by

Searching...

The Braganza Brooch

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2001,0501.1

  • Title (object)

    • The Braganza Brooch
  • Description

    Gold fibula, of long-footed form decorated with the figure of a naked warrior, wearing a Celtic helmet, with scabbard suspended from his waist and carrying a sword (scabbard and pommel are both of La Tene type), with another figure of a hunting dog jumping up to him. The eyes of both figures were originally inlaid with glass 'enamel'. The arched bow has eight curls and the side panels are elaborated with running spirals and loops, also originally inlaid with blue glass 'enamel'. Each end of the brooch is terminated by a dog's head. The hinge or spring and pin are now lost. The long foot of the fibula comprises two thick wires, twisted together and terminated with another dog's head, jaws agape and ears raised. The brooch was probably made by a Greek craftsman active on the Iberian Peninsular.

    More 

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 250BC-200BC
  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 14 centimetres (max.)
  • Bibliography

    • Perea 2007 bibliographic details
    • Stead & Meeks 1996 bibliographic details
    • Rowlett 1993 bibliographic details
  • Location

    G22/5

  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    2003/4 Oct-Jan, London, Hayward Gallery, 'Saved!100 Years of the National Art Collections Fund', no.219
    2007 1 May-31 Jul, Spain, Museo Arqueologico Nacional de Madrid, 'The Hero and the Monster',
    2009 11 Dec-2010 10 May, Madrid, Canal de Isabel II, Treasures of the World's Cultures

  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    4 May 2001

    Treatment proposal

    Light surface clean. Req 75997

    Condition

    May 2001: Slightly dull, greasy from handling. Some soil in crevices; some dirt, particularly on shield. Several broken areas, (e.g. junction of dog's forepaws with shield) old breaks, some previously glued with cyanoacrylate. Pin missing. Several areas of hard solder (modern repairs).

    Treatment details

    Req 75997 May 2001: Surface cleaned with cotton wool swabs of IMS and/or acetone. Outer surface of shield cleaned with swabs of Detarol (n-hydroxylethyl ethylenediaminetriacetic acid,trisodium salt), followed by swabs of distilled water. Numbered on underside with Magic Color ink on a brush, over a patch of Paraloid B72.

    About these records 

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2001

  • Acquisition notes

    The brooch was formerly in the collection of the Royal House of Braganza and perhaps collected by Fernando II (Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg), consort of Queen Maria of Portugal. Most of the jewels of the Braganza dynasty were inherited in 1919 by HRH Nevada of Portugal, Princess d'Braganza and Duchesse d'Oporto. She emigrated to America and on her death in 1941 the collection was sold by her heirs to Warren Piper of Chicago. The fibula was purchased by Thomas.F. Flannery Jr in 1950 at the Warren Piper sale. After examination at the British Museum in 1965, it was displayed at the "Early Celtic Art" exhibition of 1970, held in Edinburgh and the Hayward Gallery, London. From 1993 until 2000 it was on loan to the British Museum.

  • Department

    Greek & Roman Antiquities

  • Registration number

    2001,0501.1

Gold fibula, of long-footed form decorated with the figure of a naked warrior, wearing a Celtic helmet, with scabbard suspended from his waist and carrying a sword (scabbard and pommel are both of La Tene type), with another figure of a hunting dog jumping up to him.  The eyes of both figures were originally inlaid with enamel.  The arched bow has eight curls and the side panels are elaborated with running spirals and loops, also originally inlaid with blue enamel.  Each end of the brooch is terminated by a dog's head.  The hinge or spring and pin are now lost.  The long foot of the fibula comprises two thick wires, twisted together and terminated with another dog's head, jaws agape and ears raised.  The brooch was probably made by a Greek craftsman active on the Iberian Peninsular.

Gold fibula, of long-footed form decorated with the figure of a naked warrior, wearing a Celtic helmet, with scabbard suspended from his waist and carrying a sword (scabbard and pommel are both of La Tene type), with another figure of a hunting dog jumping up to him. The eyes of both figures were originally inlaid with enamel. The arched bow has eight curls and the side panels are elaborated with running spirals and loops, also originally inlaid with blue enamel. Each end of the brooch is terminated by a dog's head. The hinge or spring and pin are now lost. The long foot of the fibula comprises two thick wires, twisted together and terminated with another dog's head, jaws agape and ears raised. The brooch was probably made by a Greek craftsman active on the Iberian Peninsular.

Image description

Recommend


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about this object, please email: collectiondatabase@britishmuseum.org 

View open data for this object with SPARQL endpoint

Object reference number: GAA69540

British Museum collection data is also available in the W3C open data standard, RDF, allowing it to join and relate to a growing body of linked data published by organisations around the world.

View this object

Support the Museum:
donate online

The Museum makes its collection database available to be used by scholars around the world. Donations will help support curatorial, documentation and digitisation projects.

About the database

The British Museum collection database is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added every week.

More about the database 

Supporters

Work on this database is supported by a range of sponsors, donors and volunteers.

More about supporters and how you
can help  

Loading...