Collection online

olpe

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1849,0620.5

  • Description

    Pottery: black-figured olpe (jug). Grooved handle. Design in black on a red panel, with lotus and honeysuckle pattern along the top; accessories of white and purple.
    Perseus slaying Medusa: On the left is Perseus to right, looking back, beardless, with petasos, short embroidered chiton, over which is the skin of a deer, endromides, and the kibisis (sack) slung at his back; he grasps Medusa round the neck with left hand, and with right plunges his sword into her neck in front. Medusa moves away to right, in the archaic running attitude, with face turned to the front, of the usual Gorgon type, with short curls in front and protruding tusks and tongue; on the lower lip is a fringe of hair, and two snakes rise from her head on either side; she has a short purple chiton, over which is a stippled skin, with two snakes knotted round the waist, their heads confronted; also endromides, and two pairs of wings, outspread, the upper ones recurved. On the right is Hermes to left, bearded, with petasos, short embroidered chiton, fringed chlamys, endromides, and caduceus in left hand. Down the left side of the panel, an inscription.

    More 

  • Producer name

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 550BC-530BC (circa)
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Ware

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 25.5 centimetres
    • Width: 14.5 centimetres
    • Weight: 583 grammes
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Script

        Greek
      • Inscription Position

        Left side
      • Inscription Language

        Greek
      • Inscription Content

        AMAΣIΣMEΠOIEΣEN, "Aμασίς μ’ έποίησεν.
      • Inscription Translation

        Amasis made it.
  • Curator's comments

    BM Cat. Vases

    Wiener Voregebl. 1889, pl. 4, Ia ,Ib; Magazine of Art 1885, p. 503; Arch. Zeit.1881, p. 30, n. 3; Rev. Phil. ii. p. 391; Brunn, Küstlergesch. ii. p. 656; Klein, Meistersig. p. 44, no. 4; J.H.S. vi. p. 282; C.I.Gr. 8126.
    For the figures of Perseus and Medusa, cf. the archaic Selinus metope, Benndorf, Metopen von Selinunt pl. 1.

    More 

  • Bibliography

    • Old Catalogue 641* bibliographic details
    • Vase B471 bibliographic details
  • Location

    On display: G13/dc8

  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    1990 20 Oct-9 Dec, Japan, Tokyo, Setagaya Art Museum, Treasures of the British Museum, cat. no.96
    1991 5 Jan-20 Feb, Japan, Yamaguchi, Prefectural Museum of Art, Treasures of the British Museum, cat. no.96
    1991 9 Mar-7 May, Japan, Osaka, National Museum of Art, Treasures of the British Museum, cat. no.96
    2008 13 May-21 Sep, Frankfurt, Städtische Galerie Liebieghaus, 'Olympic Vagaries: The Myth of Athena, Marsyas and Apollo'

  • Condition

    Badly damaged.

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Associated events

    • Associated Event: Perseus kills Medusa
  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1849

  • Department

    Greek & Roman Antiquities

  • Registration number

    1849,0620.5

Pottery: black-figured olpe (jug). Grooved handle. Design in black on a red panel, with lotus and honeysuckle pattern along the top; accessories of white and purple.  Perseus slaying Medusa: On the left is Perseus to right, looking back, beardless, with petasos, short embroidered chiton, over which is the skin of a deer, endromides, and the kibisis (sack) slung at his back; he grasps Medusa round the neck with left hand, and with right plunges his sword into her neck in front. Medusa moves away to right, in the archaic running attitude, with face turned to the front, of the usual Gorgon type, with short curls in front and protruding tusks and tongue; on the lower lip is a fringe of hair, and two snakes rise from her head on either side; she has a short purple chiton, over which is a stippled skin, with two snakes knotted round the waist, their heads confronted; also endromides, and two pairs of wings, outspread, the upper ones recurved. On the right is Hermes to left, bearded, with petasos, short embroidered chiton, fringed chlamys, endromides, and caduceus in left hand. Down the left side of the panel, an inscription.

Pottery: black-figured olpe (jug). Grooved handle. Design in black on a red panel, with lotus and honeysuckle pattern along the top; accessories of white and purple. Perseus slaying Medusa: On the left is Perseus to right, looking back, beardless, with petasos, short embroidered chiton, over which is the skin of a deer, endromides, and the kibisis (sack) slung at his back; he grasps Medusa round the neck with left hand, and with right plunges his sword into her neck in front. Medusa moves away to right, in the archaic running attitude, with face turned to the front, of the usual Gorgon type, with short curls in front and protruding tusks and tongue; on the lower lip is a fringe of hair, and two snakes rise from her head on either side; she has a short purple chiton, over which is a stippled skin, with two snakes knotted round the waist, their heads confronted; also endromides, and two pairs of wings, outspread, the upper ones recurved. On the right is Hermes to left, bearded, with petasos, short embroidered chiton, fringed chlamys, endromides, and caduceus in left hand. Down the left side of the panel, an inscription.

Image description

Recommend


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about this object, please email: collectiondatabase@britishmuseum.org 

View open data for this object with SPARQL endpoint

Object reference number: GAA5947

British Museum collection data is also available in the W3C open data standard, RDF, allowing it to join and relate to a growing body of linked data published by organisations around the world.

View this object

Support the Museum:
donate online

The Museum makes its collection database available to be used by scholars around the world. Donations will help support curatorial, documentation and digitisation projects.

About the database

The British Museum collection database is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added every week.

More about the database 

Supporters

Work on this database is supported by a range of sponsors, donors and volunteers.

More about supporters and how you
can help  

Loading...