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relief

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1900,0214.21

  • Description

    Unfinished relief, probably once part of an architectural frieze.
    Armed man walking to right, with crested Corinthian helmet, spear and
    shield held out in front, the inner side being shown. The rear leg has the heel raised and shows the scratched outline of a greave, which does not appear on
    the other leg. At top and bottom was a moulding, now broken away, the slab being imperfect.
    The relief is in a low single plane, carefully smoothed and flat, save that the calves are slightly rounded; no trace of inner detail, save the scratched greave, is visible. Around are deep grooved outlines and the background is smoothed. The outlines extend beyond the shaft of the spear on the left. The slab has certainly been left unfinished, as the right edge is imperfectly tooled, and only a beginning has been made on the left, while the back is rough. On the other hand, the smoothness of relief and background suggests that the front is to be regarded as finished and that details were added in colour.

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  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 522BC-500BC (circa)
  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 36 centimetres
    • Length: 30 centimetres
  • Curator's comments

    BM Sculpture

    The finding-place precludes a sepulchral origin, and the unfinished state of the sides make an architectural purpose unlikely; the relief is, then, probably votive in character.
    The relief is certainly of the archaic period and in view of its curious technique may well be early. L. Curtius, comparing it with the well-known Euphorbos plate from Rhodes (Salzmann, Necr. de Camiros, pl. .53), assigns it to the seventh century B.C. Comparison may also be made with the East side of the Xanthian Lion Tomb (Sculpture B286), which shows the same flat relief, but appears more advanced.
    Edgar in B.S.A., 1898-1899 (V), p. 65, pl. XI (and see p. 33), and in J.H.S., 1905, p. 127; L. Curtius in Ath. Mitt., 1906, p. 165; Deonna, L’Archeologie, II, p. 306; Mendel, Constantinople Cat., I, p. 282; Poulsen in Jahrbuch, 1906, p. 206, n. 196.
    Cf. another relief from the Hellenion, J.H.S., 1905, p. 127, fig. 8.Both Edgar1898/99 and Koenigs 2007 argue for the relief originally being part of an architectural frieze. See C.C. Edgar, "Excavations at Naukratis, C. A Relief", The Annual of the British School at Athens 5 (1898/99), pp. 65-67, pl. 9.

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  • Bibliography

    • Sculpture B437 bibliographic details
    • Edgar 1898/1899 p. 33, 65-67, Pl. IX. bibliographic details
    • Koenigs 2007 p. 346-347 no. 45, pl. 32 bibliographic details
    • Höckmann 2007 pp. 141-142 bibliographic details
  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1900

  • Department

    Greek & Roman Antiquities

  • Registration number

    1900,0214.21

Unfinished sandstone relief, probably once part of an architectural frieze.
Armed man walking to right, with crested Corinthian helmet, spear and
shield held out in front, the inner side being shown. The rear leg has the heel raised and shows the scratched outline of a greave, which does not appear on
the other leg. At top and bottom was a moulding, now broken away, the slab being imperfect.
The relief is in a low single plane, carefully smoothed and flat, save that the calves are slightly rounded; no trace of inner detail, save the scratched greave, is visible. Around are deep grooved outlines and the background is smoothed. The outlines extend beyond the shaft of the spear on the left. The slab has certainly been left unfinished, as the right edge is imperfectly tooled, and only a beginning has been made on the left, while the back is rough. On the other hand, the smoothness of relief and background suggests that the front is to be regarded as finished and that details were added in colour.

Unfinished sandstone relief, probably once part of an architectural frieze. Armed man walking to right, with crested Corinthian helmet, spear and shield held out in front, the inner side being shown. The rear leg has the heel raised and shows the scratched outline of a greave, which does not appear on the other leg. At top and bottom was a moulding, now broken away, the slab being imperfect. The relief is in a low single plane, carefully smoothed and flat, save that the calves are slightly rounded; no trace of inner detail, save the scratched greave, is visible. Around are deep grooved outlines and the background is smoothed. The outlines extend beyond the shaft of the spear on the left. The slab has certainly been left unfinished, as the right edge is imperfectly tooled, and only a beginning has been made on the left, while the back is rough. On the other hand, the smoothness of relief and background suggests that the front is to be regarded as finished and that details were added in colour.

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Object reference number: GAA8626

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