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wall-painting

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1857,0415.3

  • Description

    Wall painting: woman seated to left in a gilt armchair, with a transparent white chiton over her upper body and a red mantle over her legs; to the right stands Cupid, resting his elbow on her right knee and holding a leaf-shaped fan; grey background, dark red border.

  • Culture/period

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 48.5 centimetres
    • Width: 46.5 centimetres
  • Bibliography

    • Painting 34 bibliographic details
  • Conservation

    See treatments 

    Treatment date

    7 February 2013

    Reason for treatment

    Temporary Exhibition

    Treatment proposal

    Clean surface of wall painting to remove surface dirt and dust and remove red marks (possibly crayon). Consolidate cracks and any lifting fakes. Fill and colour-match fills and tone out bright white spots.

    Condition

    The surface of the object was dusty and dirty and a water stain was visible over the drapery at the bottom centre of the painting. Four small bright red marks (possibly crayon) were present on the surface. A white bloom is visible across the entire surface of the wall painting and some circular marks are visible along the edges. Both may be related to the plaster, which was set into the four sections of the frame at the back of the object.

    A crack runs across the bottom proper right corner of the object, as well as numerous smaller hairline cracks, which can be found across the painting. There was movement to one small plaster fragment at the top proper right corner. Again, this may be related to the plaster at the back of the frame. Some small bright white ‘spots’ were visible, where there was more recent loss to the painted surface.

    Treatment details

    The object was cleaned using Wishab sponge (vulcanized latex,filler)and Chemsponge/smoke sponge (vulcanized rubber molecular trap). The surface was further cleaned with cotton wool swabs and saliva to remove more engrained dirt. In this way it was possible to bring out some of the detail of the figures and the water stain could be visibly reduced. The edges of the cracks and moving fragment were consolidated using Primal B60A (acrylic dispersion polymer) 1% v/v in deionised water. Cracks and losses were then filled using Paraloid B72 (methyl ethyl methacrlylate) 20% w/v in Acetone (propan-1-one/dimethyl ketone) and Industrial methylated spirits (ethanol,methanol)1:1. Fills and bright white spots were coloured out using Golden acrylic paints.

    About these records 

  • Subjects

  • Associated names

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1857

  • Department

    Greek & Roman Antiquities

  • Registration number

    1857,0415.3

Wall painting: woman seated to left in a gilt armchair, with a transparent white chiton over her upper body and a red mantle over her legs; to the right stands Cupid, resting his elbow on her right knee and holding a leaf-shaped fan; grey background, dark red border.

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Object reference number: GAA43111

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