What just happened?

To celebrate Vikings Live, we have replaced our Roman alphabet with the runic alphabet used by the Vikings, the Scandinavian ‘Younger Futhark’. The ‘Younger Futhark’ has only 16 letters, so we have used some of the runic letters more than once or combined two runes for one Roman letter.

For an excellent introduction to runes, we recommend Martin Findell’s book published by British Museum Press.

More information about how we have ‘runified’ this site

 

Collection online

Additional options
Production date to

Or search by

Searching...

amphora

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1856,1226.206

  • Description

    Red figured pottery amphora.
    Designs red and white, with yellow accessories, on black ground. On the lip, vine-wreath; on the neck, either side, a palmette. On the shoulder, (a) egg-moulding, tongue-pattern, and laurel-wreath; (b) tongue- and wave-patterns. Below the handles, palmettes; below, all round, maeander and crosses.
    (a) Offerings at heroon: In the centre is a distyle Ionic heroon, painted white, the beams of the roof visible inside; it stands on a high base with volutes and dots in white on a red band, and at the angles of the pediment are volutes. Within is the figure of a youth seated to left, painted white with yellow markings; drapery under him, in left hand a phiale with fruit and sprays, and a wreath, all white. Above hangs a hydria, and on the right a pilos; the left arm of the youth rests on a shield, and below him is a hydria on its side; all these objects are painted white. On the left is a female figure to right, with hair tied in a bunch, open white beaded cap, earrings, necklace, bracelets, long chiton fastened on shoulders with girdle ending in white studs, himation and white sandals; in right hand a wreath and a white taenia, in left a mirror and an embroidered taenia; above her is an embroidered taenia. On the left is a similar female figure (no girdle), with an embroidered taenia in right hand and a large mirror in left, the handle in the form of a nude female figure painted white, supporting the mirror with her arms. Above is an ivy-leaf; the ground-lines are indicated.
    (b) Two ephebi confronted, each with himation over left shoulder, sandals, and staff, standing on either side of a stele, on a level with the top of the base. Round the stele is tied a taenia, and another round the base; on either side of it is a rosette; behind each ephebos, an ivy-leaf.

    More 

  • Producer name

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 345BC-325BC
  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Ware

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 74.4 centimetres
  • Curator's comments

    BM Cat. Vases

    For the woman with the mirror, cf. BM Vase F332.

  • Bibliography

    • RVAp 23/105 bibliographic details
    • Vase F335 bibliographic details
  • Location

    G1/wp50/6

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1856

  • Department

    Greek & Roman Antiquities

  • Registration number

    1856,1226.206

There is no image of this object, or there may be copyright restrictions

Image service:

Request new photography

Recommend


Feedback

If you’ve noticed a mistake or have any further information about this object, please email: collectiondatabase@britishmuseum.org 

View open data for this object with SPARQL endpoint

Object reference number: GAA66948

British Museum collection data is also available in the W3C open data standard, RDF, allowing it to join and relate to a growing body of linked data published by organisations around the world.

View this object

Support the Museum:
donate online

The Museum makes its collection database available to be used by scholars around the world. Donations will help support curatorial, documentation and digitisation projects.

About the database

The British Museum collection database is a work in progress. New records, updates and images are added every week.

More about the database 

Supporters

Work on this database is supported by a range of sponsors, donors and volunteers.

More about supporters and how you
can help  

Loading...