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game-board

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    1991,0720.1

  • Description

    Fired clay game-board; incised with lines and perforated with holes prior to firing; used to play the game of 58 holes, also known as 'hounds and jackals' or 'the palm tree game'.

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 1300BC-900BC (about)
  • Production place

  • Findspot

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Length: 24.5 centimetres
    • Width: 11.8 centimetres
    • Thickness: 1.2 centimetres
    • Weight: 726.5 grammes
  • Curator's comments

    Sampled by Nicholas Debenham for thermoluminescence dating prior to acquisition. The gaming-board was intended for the playing of the so-called 'game of 58 holes', also known as 'hounds and jackals' or 'the palm tree game'. This was very popular throughout the Near East during the 2nd and early 1st Millennia BC. A related fired clay example was excavated in a grave at Tepe Sialk in central Iran but was painted red (Marseille 1991, cat. 259 = Louvre, AO 19438).

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  • Bibliography

    • Neumark 1991 p.27 bibliographic details
  • Location

    Not on display

  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    1995-2005 17 Nov-14 Dec, BM, G52/IRAN/24
    1994, BM, G49/IRAN

  • Condition

    Fair

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    1991

  • Department

    Middle East

  • Registration number

    1991,0720.1

Ceramic gaming board; incised with lines and holes; used to play the game of 58 holes, also known as 'hounds and jackals' or 'the palm tree game'; popular throughout the Near East during the 2nd and early 1st Millennia BC; the lines linking the holes are comparable to snakes and ladders.

Ceramic gaming board; incised with lines and holes; used to play the game of 58 holes, also known as 'hounds and jackals' or 'the palm tree game'; popular throughout the Near East during the 2nd and early 1st Millennia BC; the lines linking the holes are comparable to snakes and ladders.

Image description

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Object reference number: WCO26058

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