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vase-stand / vase

  • Object type

  • Museum number

    2012,3019.1

  • Description

    Large vase. Decorated with auspicious flowers and peach sprays. Made of white porcelain. With original carved hardwood stand designed by the artist, inner storage box inscribed by the artist with the title, signature and seal, and outer storage box.

  • Producer name

  • Culture/period

  • Date

    • 1925 (circa)
  • Production place

  • Materials

  • Technique

  • Dimensions

    • Height: 29.3 centimetres
    • Width: 23 centimetres
    • Height: 4.5 centimetres (stand)
    • Width: 14 centimetres (stand)
  • Inscriptions

      • Inscription Type

        seal
      • Inscription Position

        inner storage box
      • Inscription Content

        波山
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Hazan
      • Inscription Comment

        in underglaze copper red
      • Inscription Type

        inscription
      • Inscription Position

        inner storage box
      • Inscription Content

        波山作
      • Inscription Transliteration

        Hazan saku
  • Curator's comments

    This tranquil white vase with a carved design of blossoming fruit branches was created by Itaya Hazan, who became one of the most famous ceramic artists in 20th-century Japan. Hazan was born in Ibaraki and studied at the prestigious Tokyo Fine Arts School and then went on to teach sculpture in Ishikawa Prefectural Industrial School. At the age of 30 he made the momentous decision to become one of Japan's first art-potters and moved back to Tokyo area to start his kiln. Creating as few as 20 works a year, his ceramics currently are mostly in museum and private collections in Japan, where he is a household name. Only a few of his works are in collections outside of Japan, and this example is possibly the first in a European Museum collection. Hazan received the Bunka kunshō or Order of Culture from the government in 1953. One of his works is designated an Important Cultural Property, a rare honour he shares with Miyagawa Kozan.

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  • Location

    G94/dc16

  • Exhibition history

    Exhibited:

    2012 Oct -, BM Japanese Galleries, 'Japan from prehistory to the present'

  • Subjects

  • Acquisition name

  • Acquisition date

    2012

  • Acquisition notes

    Credit Line: Acquisition supported by the Brooke Sewell Bequest and the Art Fund.

  • Department

    Asia

  • Registration number

    2012,3019.1

Large vase. Auspicious flowers and peach sprays. Made of white porcelain. With original carved hardwood stand designed by the artist (4.5 x 14.0 cm), inner storage box inscribed by the artist with the title, signed ‘Hazan saku’ ??? and sealed ‘Hazan’ ??, and outer storage box.

Large vase. Auspicious flowers and peach sprays. Made of white porcelain. With original carved hardwood stand designed by the artist (4.5 x 14.0 cm), inner storage box inscribed by the artist with the title, signed ‘Hazan saku’ ??? and sealed ‘Hazan’ ??, and outer storage box.

Image description

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Object reference number: JCR23100

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